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Robert Mueller. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The Supreme Court issued a stay on Wednesday denying House Democrats immediate access to secret grand jury materials from the Mueller report in order to give the Trump administration time to appeal a lower court decision.

Why it matters: Democrats say the material could help them determine whether President Trump obstructed the Mueller investigation, possibly requiring new articles of impeachment.

The big picture: The Trump administration asked the Supreme Court earlier this month to temporarily block an appellate ruling that would force the Justice Department to release the grand jury testimony to Congress.

  • Solicitor General Noel Francisco argued to the Supreme Court that the release of the documents would cause irreparable harm to the executive branch.
  • Counsel for the House Judiciary Committee said in a filing this week that "the committee's impeachment investigation related to obstruction of justice pertaining to the Russia investigation is ongoing" and that the grand jury testimony may be relevant.

What to watch: The Supreme Court gave the Trump administration until June 1 to file its appeal.

Go deeper

Court deems Virginia school board's transgender bathroom ban unconstitutional

Gavin Grimm attends 2019 DoSomething Gala in New York City. Photo: Santiago Felipe/Getty Images

A federal appeals court ruled Wednesday that a Virginia school board's transgender bathroom ban is unconstitutional — a win for transgender rights proponents, AP reports.

Context: Gavin Grimm sued Gloucester County School Board after he was told to use private restrooms or bathrooms that did not match his gender identity while at school.

2 hours ago - World

Special report: Trump's U.S.-China transformation

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

President Trump began his term by launching the trade war with China he had promised on the campaign trail. By mid-2020, however, Trump was no longer the public face of China policy-making as he became increasingly consumed with domestic troubles, giving his top aides carte blanche to pursue a cascade of tough-on-China policies.

Why it matters: Trump alone did not reshape the China relationship. But his trade war shattered global norms, paving the way for administration officials to pursue policies that just a few years earlier would have been unthinkable.

McConnell: Trump "provoked" Capitol mob

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) said on Tuesday that the pro-Trump mob that stormed the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6 was "provoked by the president and other powerful people."

Why it matters: Trump was impeached by the House last week for "incitement of insurrection." McConnell has not said how he will vote in Trump's coming Senate impeachment trial, but sources told Axios' Mike Allen that the chances of him voting to convict are higher than 50%.