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Demonstrators protest federal executions of death row inmates, in front of the Justice Department in Washington, D.C., in December. Photo: Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images

Lisa Montgomery became on Wednesday the first female inmate to be executed since 1953, per AP.

The big picture: The 52-year-old Kansas woman was declared dead at 1:31am after having a lethal injection at the federal prison in Terre Haute, Indiana, following a Supreme Court ruling late Tuesday.

  • The court sided with the Trump administration in the 6-3 ruling, one day after a federal judge granted Montgomery a stay of execution hours before she was originally scheduled to die.
  • The Supreme Court's three liberal justices dissented.

Of note: Montgomery's attorneys had argued that the Eighth Amendment prohibits the execution of people like Montgomery who, "due to their severe mental illness or brain damage, do not understand the basis for their executions."

For the record: Federal executions had been stalled for 16 years, until the Trump administration resumed federal capital punishment last July, Axios' Oriana Gonzalez notes.

  • Montgomery was one of three inmates the Department of Justice scheduled to be executed this week — days before the inauguration of President-elect Joe Biden, who's against the federal death penalty.

Background: Montgomery was convicted in 2004 for the murder of 23-year-old Bobbie Jo Stinnett, who was eight months pregnant, cutting her baby from her stomach and kidnapping the child.

  • The baby survived the 2004 attack in the northwest Missouri town of Skidmore.

Go deeper: Trump's last word on executions

Editor's note: This article has been updated with new details throughout.

Go deeper

Supreme Court sides with Trump administration on abortion pill rule

Capitol Police stand guard at the Supreme Court Tuesday in Washington, D.C. Photo:y Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

The Supreme Court granted a Trump administration appeal on Tuesday and reinstated a federal requirement obligating women seeking an abortion pill to obtain the drug from a hospital or medical center in person.

Why it matters: It's the court's first ruling on abortion since the arrival of the conservative Trump-appointed Justice Amy Coney Barrett.

3 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Biden's latest executive order: Buy American

President Joe R. Biden speaks about the economy before signing executive orders in the State Dining Room at the White House on Friday, Jan 22, 2021 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

President Joe Biden will continue his flurry of executive orders on Monday, signing a new directive to require the federal government to “buy American” for products and services.

Why it matters: The executive action is yet another attempt by Biden to accomplish goals administratively without waiting for the backing of Congress. The new order echoes Biden's $400 billion campaign pledge to increase government purchases of American goods.

Tech digs in for long domestic terror fight

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

With domestic extremist networks scrambling to regroup online, experts fear the next attack could come from a radicalized individual — much harder than coordinated mass events for law enforcement and platforms to detect or deter.

The big picture: Companies like Facebook and Twitter stepped up enforcement and their conversations with law enforcement ahead of Inauguration Day. But they'll be tested as the threat rises that impatient lone-wolf attackers will lash out.