Feb 28, 2020 - Sports

States follow California, introduce bills to pay student-athletes

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Reproduced from Student Player; Cartogram: Axios Visuals

In late September, California passed a bill that allows college athletes in the state to receive compensation for their name, image and likeness (NIL) starting in 2023.

The state of play: Lawmakers across the country have introduced similar bills in the five months since then.

  • While most agree that national standards would ultimately be preferable to state-by-state chaos, proponents of change have applauded states for pushing the issue and forcing the NCAA to the table to agree that change is needed.

Driving the news: The Florida bill is likely to pass both the state's House and Senate before the legislative session ends in mid-March and would go into effect either this July or July 2021, The Athletic reports (subscription).

  • If that happens, it would make Florida the first state where athletes can begin accepting endorsement money — well before Jan. 1, 2023, the effective date of California's original bill.

Go deeper: NCAA coaches react to California law allowing student-athletes to be paid

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Colorado joins California in allowing college athletes to profit off name and likeness

Reproduced from Student Player; Cartogram: Axios Visuals

California passed a bill in September that will allow college athletes in the state to profit off their name, image and likeness (NIL) starting on Jan. 1, 2023.

Driving the news: Colorado Gov. Jared Polis signed a similar bill on Friday that will take effect on the same date.

Go deeperArrowMar 23, 2020 - Sports

The ripple effects of March Sadness

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The NCAA men's basketball tournament makes up more than 75% of the organization's annual revenue, so ever since March Madness was canceled, college administrators have been bracing for an economic gut punch.

Driving the news: The NCAA delivered the blow yesterday, announcing that it will distribute just $225 million to Division I conferences and schools for 2020 — less than half of the $600 million that had originally been budgeted.

Go deeperArrowMar 27, 2020 - Sports

March Madness games to be played without fans due to coronavirus

Photo: Jamie Schwaberow/NCAA Photos via Getty Images

The NCAA men's and women's basketball tournaments will be played without fans, NCAA president Mark Emmert announced in a statement Wednesday.

Why it matters: The shock announcement comes days before Selection Sunday will kick off March Madness, one of the most highly anticipated sporting events of the year. The World Health Organization announced Wednesday that it classified the novel coronavirus outbreak as a pandemic.

Go deeperArrowMar 11, 2020 - Health