Updated Mar 13, 2020 - Economy & Business

Stocks rebound after Wall Street’s worst day since 1987

Photo: Bryan R. Smith/AFP via Getty Images

Stocks closed up more than 9% on Friday, following the stock market's worst day in 30 years.

Why it matters: Stocks jumped during Trump's coronavirus press conference, ending Wall Street's wild week with its best single-day performance since the financial crisis.

By the numbers: The S&P 500, Nasdaq Composite and the Dow all rose about 9.3%, adding to earlier gains after Trump declared a national emergency.

  • The S&P shed 8% this week. The index, which fell into a bear market in a record 16 trading sessions, is 20.1% from its all-time high.

The bottom line: Investors increasingly expect a recession, and warn the eye-popping volatility that we saw this week could continue as news develops around the coronavirus outbreak.

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Stocks sink 4% as Dow closes in bear market

Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Stocks fell more than 4% on Wednesday, with the Dow closing in bear market territory — or 20% below the record high hit in February.

Why it matters: The Dow's steep drop ends one major index's record 11-year stretch without a 20% decline, as Wall Street grapples with just how bad the coronavirus will be for the global economy. The S&P 500 is about 30 points away from hitting bear market territory.

Go deeperArrowUpdated Mar 11, 2020 - Economy & Business

Stocks plunge 7% at close of Wall Street's brutal day

Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images

U.S. stocks closed more than 7% lower on Monday, after a wild day for the stock market that saw a rare halt in trading.

Why it matters: The sell-off reflects serious fears that the oil price drop and the coronavirus could throw the economy into a recession.

Go deeperArrowUpdated Mar 9, 2020 - Economy & Business

Stocks jump more than 4% after last week's sell-off

Traders work on the floor of the NYSE. Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Stocks closed up more than 4% on Monday, rebounding from Wall Street's worst week since the financial crisis. The S&P 500 is 8% below its record high, moving out of correction territory.

The big picture: The gains come despite more news of the coronavirus outbreak spreading in the U.S. and around the globe. Central banks, including the Federal Reserve, indicated willingness to step in to soften the blow of any coronavirus impact to the global economy.

Go deeperArrowUpdated Mar 2, 2020 - Economy & Business