Photo: Bryan R. Smith/AFP via Getty Images

Stocks closed up more than 9% on Friday, following the stock market's worst day in 30 years.

Why it matters: Stocks jumped during Trump's coronavirus press conference, ending Wall Street's wild week with its best single-day performance since the financial crisis.

By the numbers: The S&P 500, Nasdaq Composite and the Dow all rose about 9.3%, adding to earlier gains after Trump declared a national emergency.

  • The S&P shed 8% this week. The index, which fell into a bear market in a record 16 trading sessions, is 20.1% from its all-time high.

The bottom line: Investors increasingly expect a recession, and warn the eye-popping volatility that we saw this week could continue as news develops around the coronavirus outbreak.

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Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 12 p.m. ET: 11,495,412 — Total deaths: 535,185 — Total recoveries — 6,217,763Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 12 p.m. ET: 2,897,613 — Total deaths: 129,953 — Total recoveries: 906,763 — Total tested: 35,512,916Map.
  3. Public health: Case growth outpacing testing in hotspots — Medical community urges public to wear masks.
  4. States: Texas hospitals in danger of being overwhelmed amid surge.
  5. Politics: Meadows says Trump "is right" to claim 99% of coronavirus cases are "harmless."

Court orders temporary shutdown of Dakota Access Pipeline

Protesters against the Dakota Access Pipeline in San Francisco in 2017. Photo: Joel Angel Juarez/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

A federal judge ordered Monday the shutdown of the Dakota Access Pipeline — a project at the heart of battles over oil-and-gas infrastructure — while the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers conducts a new environmental analysis.

Why it matters: The latest twist in the years-long fight over the pipeline is a defeat for the White House agenda of advancing fossil fuel projects and a win for Native Americans and environmentalists who oppose the project

3 hours ago - Technology

Tensions between tech industry and tech media boil over

The New York Times building. Photo: Avalon/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Tensions between tech and tech media hit a boiling point over the weekend, in the latest fraying of a once-cozy relationship.

The shortest version is that New York Times reporter Taylor Lorenz tweeted out some screenshots from the public Instagram of Away CEO Steph Korey, in which she criticized media coverage of her company.