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Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

If you thought March felt like the longest month in American history, just wait for April and May, when people will be forced to witness spring from the indoors.

The big picture: 28 states are in or entering lockdown, with Maryland and Virginia joining those ranks today. So is D.C., as its mayor made official this afternoon. Those states include roughly 3/4 of the American people, the N.Y. Times notes.

  • "[R]esearchers and medical experts, they're saying that in two weeks' time, the D.C., Maryland and Virginia areas could look like New York and the tri-state area," Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan said today.

Between the lines: Governors in states with beaches or other outdoor recreation have run into problems with keeping crowds at a minimum.

  • The governors from Maryland and Virginia said crowds drawn out by nice weather over the weekend caused them to put the hammer down on mandatory stay-at-home orders.

Why it matters: The numbers that persuaded President Trump to extend the 15-day lockdown are premised under the assumption of a lockdown through May, professor Chris Murray told the WashPost today.

  • Anthony Fauci told CNN today that Trump decided to extend social distancing restrictions for another 30 days after viewing Murray's models projecting coronavirus deaths over the weekend, Axios' Jacob Knutson reports.
  • Murray predicts an April 15 hospital peak, when his model says more than 2,000 Americans will die that day.
  • The model expects 82,000 deaths by early August.
  • That's the "if we do it right" scenario.

The bottom line: For most people, this isn't a crisis that can be fixed via direct action. Instead, we're huddling at home, waiting and watching to see how it plays out.

Go deeper

Netflix tops 200 million global subscribers

Illustration: Rebecca Zisser/Axios

Netflix said that it added another 8.5 million global subscribers last quarter, bringing its total number of paid subscribers globally to more than 200 million.

The big picture: Positive fourth quarter results show Netflix's resiliency, despite increased competition and pandemic-related production headwinds.

Janet Yellen plays down debt, tax hike concerns in confirmation hearing

Treasury Secretary nominee Janet Yellen at an event in December. (Photo: Alex Wong via Getty Images)

Janet Yellen, Biden's pick to lead the Treasury Department, pushed back against two key concerns from Republican senators at her confirmation hearing on Tuesday: the country's debt and the incoming administration's plans to eventually raise taxes.

Driving the news: Yellen — who's expected to win confirmation — said spending big now will prevent the U.S. from having to dig out of a deeper hole later. She also said the Biden administration's priority right now is coronavirus relief, not raising taxes.

Trump gives farewell address: "We did what we came here to do"

Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump gave a farewell video address on Tuesday, saying that his administration "did what we came here to do — and so much more."

Why it matters, via Axios' Alayna Treene: The address is very different from the Trump we've seen in his final weeks as president — one who has refused to accept his loss, who peddled conspiracy theories that fueled the attack on the Capitol, and who is boycotting his successor's inauguration.