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President Trump leaves the White House on foot to go to St John's Episcopal Church across Lafayette Park in Washington, DC on June 1, 2020. Photo :Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

President Trump said in his Rose Garden remarks: "If a city or a state refuses to take the actions that are necessary to defend the life and property of their residents, then I will deploy the United States military and quickly solve the problem for them."

The big picture: Legal experts say the president has the authority under the Insurrection Act of 1807 to dispatch the military to states that are unable to put down an insurrection or are defying federal law, AP explains.

  • Presidents have sent the military to Southern states to ensure desegregation of schools, to protect civil rights in the 1950s and 1960s, and to L.A. in 1992 to quell riots after four police officers were acquitted of beating and arresting Rodney King.

The bottom line: Use of the act likely would be met with legal opposition, and strong opposition from governors seeing it as an overreaction.

  • New York Attorney General Letitia James said the state is prepared to go to court to prevent it: "The President of the United States is not a dictator."
  • Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker said on CNN, the "rhetoric coming out of the White House is making it worse."

Go deeper...Updates: George Floyd protests nationwide

Go deeper

Nadler accuses Barr of undermining democratic norms in opening statement

House Judiciary Chairman Jerry Nadler (D-N.Y.) painted the integrity of the Justice Department as "more at risk than at any time in modern history" in opening remarks at a hearing for Attorney General Bill Barr Tuesday, accusing him of shielding President Trump from responsibility and eroding democratic norms.

Why it matters: The hearing, which focuses on the DOJ's alleged politicization under Barr, is the attorney general's first time appearing before the committee. Barr in his own remarks accused the committee's Democrats of trying to discredit him over his investigations into the origins of the FBI's Russia probe.

Salesforce rolls the dice on Slack

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Salesforce's likely acquisition of workplace messaging service Slack — not yet a done deal but widely anticipated to be announced Tuesday afternoon — represents a big gamble for everyone involved.

For Slack, challenged by competition from Microsoft, the bet is that a deeper-pocketed owner like Salesforce, with wide experience selling into large companies, will help the bottom line.

FBI stats show border cities are among the safest

Data: FBI, Kansas Bureau of Investigation; Note: This table includes the eight largest communities on the U.S.-Mexico border and eight other U.S. cities similar in population size and demographics; Chart: Naema Ahmed/Axios

U.S. communities along the Mexico border are among the safest in America, with some border cities holding crime rates well below the national average, FBI statistics show.

Why it matters: The latest crime data collected by the FBI from 2019 contradicts the narrative by President Trump and others that the U.S.-Mexico border is a "lawless" region suffering from violence and mayhem.