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Starbuck signs in The Hague, Netherlands. Photo: Yuriko Nakao/Getty Images

Starbucks announced Sunday it will pause all advertisements on social media platforms in a "stand against hate speech," CNBC reports.

Why it matters: Starbucks is following in the footsteps of other companies, such as Unilever and Coca-Cola, who have pulled paid advertisements from platforms like Facebook because of content moderation policies and the spread of hate speech.

  • A spokesperson for Starbucks said this social media pause will not include YouTube, which is owned by Google. The company will also continue to post on social media without paid promotion.

What they're saying: “We believe in bringing communities together, both in person and online, and we stand against hate speech,” the company said in a statement Sunday, according to CNBC.

  • “We believe more must be done to create welcoming and inclusive online communities, and we believe both business leaders and policy makers need to come together to affect real change.”

The big picture: Massive advertisers have pulled ads from Facebook amid backlash over how the platform polices political misinformation and how it handles inflammatory or misleading content posted by President Trump.

  • Verizon, Coca-Cola, Unilever, Hershey and a number of outdoor retail brands joined the boycott last week, ramping up pressure on the social media network ahead of the 2020 election.
  • Though it is pausing advertising, Starbucks said it is not specifically joining the campaign against Facebook.

Go deeper: The bottom-up revolution hits Facebook

Go deeper

Ina Fried, author of Login
Oct 2, 2020 - Technology

Get ready for a flood of deepfakes, experts warn

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

If social media platforms don't start dealing much more aggressively with altered audio and video, they risk seeing their platforms devolve into a sea of faked content, experts tell Axios.

Why it matters: The platforms are already struggling to deal with manipulated media, and the technology to create "deepfakes," which are fabricated media generated by machine-learning-based software, is improving rapidly.

9 hours ago - World

Maximum pressure campaign escalates with Fakhrizadeh killing

Photo: Fars News Agency via AP

The assassination of Mohsen Fakhrizadeh, the architect of Iran’s military nuclear program, is a new height in the maximum pressure campaign led by the Trump administration and the Netanyahu government against Iran.

Why it matters: It exceeds the capture of the Iranian nuclear archives by the Mossad, and the sabotage in the advanced centrifuge facility in Natanz.

Scoop: Biden weighs retired General Lloyd Austin for Pentagon chief

Lloyd Austin testifying before Congress in 2015. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Joe Biden is considering retired four-star General Lloyd Austin as his nominee for defense secretary, adding him to a shortlist that includes Jeh Johnson, Tammy Duckworth and Michele Flournoy, two sources with direct knowledge of the decision-making tell Axios.

Why it matters: A nominee for Pentagon chief was noticeably absent when the president-elect rolled out his national security team Tuesday. Flournoy had been widely seen as the likely pick, but Axios is told other factors — race, experience, Biden's comfort level — have come into play.