Starbuck signs in The Hague, Netherlands. Photo: Yuriko Nakao/Getty Images

Starbucks announced Sunday it will pause all advertisements on social media platforms in a "stand against hate speech," CNBC reports.

Why it matters: Starbucks is following in the footsteps of other companies, such as Unilever and Coca-Cola, who have pulled paid advertisements from platforms like Facebook because of content moderation policies and the spread of hate speech.

  • A spokesperson for Starbucks said this social media pause will not include YouTube, which is owned by Google. The company will also continue to post on social media without paid promotion.

What they're saying: “We believe in bringing communities together, both in person and online, and we stand against hate speech,” the company said in a statement Sunday, according to CNBC.

  • “We believe more must be done to create welcoming and inclusive online communities, and we believe both business leaders and policy makers need to come together to affect real change.”

The big picture: Massive advertisers have pulled ads from Facebook amid backlash over how the platform polices political misinformation and how it handles inflammatory or misleading content posted by President Trump.

  • Verizon, Coca-Cola, Unilever, Hershey and a number of outdoor retail brands joined the boycott last week, ramping up pressure on the social media network ahead of the 2020 election.
  • Though it is pausing advertising, Starbucks said it is not specifically joining the campaign against Facebook.

Go deeper: The bottom-up revolution hits Facebook

Go deeper

Jun 29, 2020 - Technology

Facebook boycott battle goes global

Photo Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photo by Jamie Squire/Getty Images

The Madison Avenue boycott against Facebook has quickly grown into a worldwide movement against the content moderation policies of social media giants.

Why it matters: The initial Facebook boycott among advertisers, prompted by Facebook's refusal to fact-check a post by President Trump, has hit a nerve amongst people outside of the marketing community, who think boycotting social media advertising altogether could help to create a healthier internet.

As boycott grows, Facebook juggles rights groups and advertisers

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

As an advertiser boycott of Facebook over its tolerance of hate speech continues to snowball, the company has begun making small, incremental changes to mollify activists while it tries to buy time to evolve its content policies.

Driving the news: Sources tell Axios that the product and policy changes sought by the #StopHateForProfit campaign were long under discussion both inside Facebook and with some external groups. Meanwhile, CEO Mark Zuckerberg has reportedly told employees that the boycotting advertisers will be back before long.

Jun 30, 2020 - Technology

Tech finally begins a crackdown on Trump

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Social media giants are no longer giving Donald Trump, his supporters and the alt-right a free pass for inflammatory or misleading speech online.

Why it matters: For years, President Trump and far-right extremists have relied on the loose content policies of tech platforms to reach millions of Americans unfiltered. Ahead of the 2020 election, social media may be turning down the volume on Trump's online megaphone.