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Retired Gen. Stanley McChrystal endorsed former Vice President Joe Biden for president on MSNBC Thursday.

Why it matters: McChrystal came under fire in 2010 during the Obama administration after a Rolling Stone article quoted him as mocking some top civilian officials — including Biden. The general apologized to Biden but was ultimately pushed to resign.

  • The general wrote in a 2010 statement on his resignation that he continued to "strongly support the president's strategy in Afghanistan" and that it was out of respect for the mission that he resigned.

What they're saying: McChrystal first endorsed Rep. Seth Moulton (D-Mass.) in the 2020 Democratic primaries. He told MSNBC on Thursday that he's always had respect for President Obama and Biden, and that the 2010 event was "more smoke than fire."

  • "I think my willingness to endorse him now should signal to people that there was a respectful relationship then and just how important I think it is to replicate that kind of relationship between senior military leaders now."

McChrystal continued: "I worked most closely with President Obama and Vice President Biden when I commanded in Afghanistan, and I had policy differences at times. ... But in every instance, they listened. In every instance, they took in my view."

  • "In every instance, I felt that they were trying to make the best decision based on all the information they had and based upon a bedrock of values."

Between the lines: McChrystal's endorsement comes weeks after The Atlantic reported that President Trump called members of the military "suckers," drawing major backlash.

His bottom line: "We have to believe in our values. You have to believe that your commander and chief, at the end of the day, is someone that you can trust, and I can trust Joe Biden," McChrystal said.

Go deeper

Scoop: Trump administration declassifies unconfirmed intel on Chinese bounties

Trump speaks during a press conference on China in the Rose Garden of the White House on May 29. Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

The Trump administration is declassifying as-yet uncorroborated intelligence, recently briefed to President Trump, that indicates China offered to pay non-state actors in Afghanistan to attack American soldiers, two senior administration officials tell Axios.

The big picture: The disclosure of this unconfirmed intelligence comes 21 days before the end of Trump's presidency, after he has vowed to ratchet up pressure on China, and months after news reports indicated that the Russians had secretly offered bounties for Taliban militants to kill U.S. troops in Afghanistan.

Kaine, Collins' censure resolution seeks to bar Trump from holding office again

Sen. Tim Kaine (center) and Sen. Susan Collins (right). Photo: Andrew Harnik/Pool via Getty Images

Sens. Tim Kaine (D-Va.) and Susan Collins (R-Maine) are forging ahead with a draft proposal to censure former President Trump, and are considering introducing the resolution on the Senate floor next week.

Why it matters: Senators are looking for a way to condemn Trump on the record as it becomes increasingly unlikely Democrats will obtain the 17 Republican votes needed to gain a conviction, Axios Alayna Treene writes. "I think it’s important for the Senate's leadership to understand that there are alternatives," Kaine told CNN on Wednesday.

Stark reminder for America's corporate leaders

Rosalind "Roz" Brewer is about to become only the second Black woman to permanently lead a Fortune 500 company. She starts as Walgreens CEO on March 15.

Why it matters: It's a stark reminder of how far corporate America's top decision-makers have to go during an unprecedented push by politicians, employees and even a stock exchange to diversify their top ranks.