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The U.S. spent $3.34 trillion on health care in 2016 — a 4.3% increase from 2015 and an amount that almost equals Germany's entire economy, according to new data from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. That spending growth is slightly lower than what CMS initially predicted in February, and it's a lower growth rate than 2014 and 2015.

Yes, but: Even a slower 4.3% uptick in health care spending greatly outpaced the 2.8% growth of the broader U.S. economy. Health care continues to absorb a greater share of the overall economy, which eats into other areas like education and infrastructure.

Expand chart
Data: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon / Axios

Here are some of the other highlights of the national health spending data:

  • Total out-of-pocketing spending — which includes what Americans spent on deductibles, copays, coinsurance and uncovered services — increased 3.9% in 2016. That's the highest growth rate since 2007. More health care costs are falling on the shoulders of Americans, and it's a major reason why people are becoming even more upset with the system.
  • The amount Medicare spent on health care last year increased 3.6%, compared with 4.8% in 2015. CMS could not say how much, if any, of that lower growth rate could be attributed to models that pay for outcomes instead of volume.
  • The Affordable Care Act's expansion of health insurance coverage in the individual markets and Medicaid were major reasons why spending increased in 2014 and 2015. But insurance coverage remained mostly stable last year, hence why spending did not grow as much.

Go deeper

Scoop: Caitlyn Jenner makes it official for California governor

Caitlyn Jenner. Photo: Paul Archuleta/Getty Images

Former Olympic decathlete and reality TV star Caitlyn Jenner has filed her initial paperwork to run for governor of California and will officially announce her bid later today, her campaign tells Axios.

The big picture: Jenner, a longtime Republican, is seeking to replace Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom in a recall election, hoping her celebrity status and name recognition can yield an upset in the nation's most populous state.

Kendall Baker, author of Sports
43 mins ago - Sports

New laws, new rules bring big changes to college sports

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The college sports landscape could change more in the next six months than it has in the last 50 years, as the NCAA grapples with new competition, new laws and new rules.

How it works... 1. Startup leagues: Investors are flocking to new leagues that aim to compete with the NCAA, evidence of just how much opposition there is to the amateurism model — and how much belief there is in new ones.

2 hours ago - Health

Malaria vaccine from Oxford highly effective in early trials

Family in Brazil under a malaria net. Photo: J R Ripper/Brazil Photos/LightRocket via Getty Images

A malaria vaccine developed by Oxford University was found to have "high-level efficacy" in phase II trials, according to a pre-print study released on Friday.

Why it matters: Malaria kills over 400,000 people a year, more than half of them children under the age of 5. Deaths have fallen in half over the past 20 years thanks to investment in prevention and drugs, but a truly effective malaria vaccine would represent one of the greatest victories in the history of public health.