Ruhrfisch / Flickr Creative Commons

More hospitals and physicians are participating in financing and delivery models established by the Affordable Care Act — even though Republicans are determined to repeal the law and have offered no details on replacing those models.

What's happening: In a report Wednesday, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services said more health care providers are enrolling in so-called alternative payment models, where hospitals and doctors form networks and are paid based on how well they care for patients. One of the most common models is the accountable care organization.

Why it matters: The continued interest in these models, despite the threat of Obamacare repeal, indicates that health care leaders believe these practices have some staying power.

More than 12 million Medicare members are now served through one of these Obamacare payment models.

The model to watch: Medicare's Next Generation accountable care organizations are some of the most interesting projects because they require hospitals and doctors to take on more financial risk for the quality and safety of their patient care. There were 18 Next Generation groups in 2016, and that has expanded to 45 for this year. Some interesting tidbits from that model:

  • The government was able to attract some big health system names into the Next Generation program. They include Dartmouth-Hitchcock, a well-known system in New Hampshire that initially passed on the program, and Sharp HealthCare, a San Diego-based network that bailed on an early version of an accountable care organization model in 2014.
  • UnitedHealth Group is participating in Next Generation through its Optum subsidiary. The insurance conglomerate clearly is investing more in its provider services.
  • More providers can join the Next Generation program. The federal government is accepting new applicants for 2018.

Go deeper

3 hours ago - Health

Fauci says if people won't wear masks, maybe it should be mandated

Anthony Fauci. Photo: Graeme Jennings- Pool/Getty Images

NIAID director Anthony Fauci told CNN on Friday evening that if "people are not wearing masks, then maybe we should be mandating it."

Why it matters: Fauci made the comments the same day the U.S. hit its highest daily COVID-19 case count since the pandemic began.

Harris to Black voters: Casting a ballot is about honoring your ancestors

Democratic vice presidential nominee Kamala Harris speaks at a "Get Out The Vote" rally at Morehouse College. Photo: Elijah Nouvelage/AFP via Getty Images

Sen. Kamala Harris appealed to Black voters in Georgia on Friday, urging them to "honor the ancestors" by casting ballots, and again calling President Trump a "racist."

Why it matters: The U.S. saw a significant decline in African-American voter turnout between 2012 and 2016, reaching its lowest point since 2000. Higher turnout among Black Americans this year could tip the balance in favor of Democrats in key battleground states, including Georgia.

Updated 3 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Politics: Fauci: Trump hasn't been to a COVID task force meeting in months.
  2. Sports: The youth sports exodus continues — Big Ten football is back.
  3. Health: U.S. hits highest daily COVID-19 case count since pandemic began —AstraZeneca to resume vaccine trial in U.S.How to help save 130,000 lives.
  4. Retail: Santa won't greet kids at Macy's this year.
  5. World: Spain and France exceed 1 million cases.