Photo: Erik McGregor / Getty

A group of four dozen Silicon Valley companies filed an amicus brief Wednesday in support of a California federal judge's decision to permanently block President Trump's executive order, which threatened to withhold federal funds from sanctuary cities.

Big picture: Most major tech hubs are also sanctuary cities, and the loss of immigrant talent and federal funding could be detrimental to companies in the tech industry. San Francisco and Santa Clara initially filed the lawsuit, which resulted in District Court Judge William Orrick temporarily blocking the order last April and then permanently blocking it in November. The Department of Justice appealed the both injunctions.

Who's backing it: The brief is missing big names like Apple, Facebook, Microsoft, Google and Salesforce, which have taken on the government in other cases. Among the biggest names on the list are PayPal, Airbnb

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Investors are ignoring the coronavirus pandemic by buying stocks and gold

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

U.S. economic data is crumbling as increasing coronavirus cases keep consumers at home and force more cities and states to restrict commerce, but the stock market has continued to rise.

What's happening: Bullish fund managers are starting to lay down bets that it will be this way for a while. "The reason is: You have monetary and fiscal policy pushing the economy out of a problem and that is very, very bullish," Andrew Slimmon, senior portfolio manager at Morgan Stanley Investment Management, tells Axios.

How Trump's push to reopen schools could backfire

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

The Trump administration’s full-steam-ahead push to fully reopen schools this fall is on a collision course with the U.S.' skyrocketing coronavirus caseload and its decades-long neglect of public education.

Why it matters: Getting kids back to school is of paramount importance for children and families, especially low-income ones. But the administration isn’t doing much to make this safer or more feasible.

Coronavirus squeezes the "sandwich generation"

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

As the coronavirus poses risks and concerns for the youngest and oldest Americans, the generations in the middle are buckling under the increasing strain of having to take care of both.

Why it matters: People that make up the so-called sandwich generations are typically in their 30s, 40s and 50s, and in their prime working years. The increasing family and financial pressures on these workers means complications for employers, too.