Searching for smart, safe news you can TRUST?

Support safe, smart, REAL journalism. Sign up for our Axios AM & PM newsletters and get smarter, faster.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Searching for smart, safe news you can TRUST?

Support safe, smart, REAL journalism. Sign up for our Axios AM & PM newsletters and get smarter, faster.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Minneapolis-St. Paul

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa-St. Petersburg news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa-St. Petersburg

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Senate Democrats on Thursday blocked Republicans' efforts to pass a slimmed down $500 billion coronavirus relief bill.

Why it matters: The bill was always going to be dead on arrival.

  • Instead, the legislation was seen widely as a political maneuver to put Democrats, who passed their $3 trillion HEROES Act in May, on defense.
  • Republicans also hope the vote will create more goodwill with the public as broader negotiations between Congress and the White House remain in a stalemate.

Details: The bill would have included an extension of the small business Paycheck Protection Program, expanded enhanced unemployment benefits, and provided more funding for schools and child care programs.

Between the lines: Republicans, who knew the bill would never pass the Senate given it covers just a fraction of what Democrats' want in a new relief package, were initially concerned the bill wouldn't even get a 51-vote majority — something that would have been seen as a major failure by the White House and Senate Republican leadership.

  • However, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell was able to cobble together enough votes in the 11th hour to push the tally to 52-47.
  • Every GOP senator, apart from Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.), voted in favor of the legislation. Every Senate Democrat voted against the package.

The other side: House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer have said the proposal "is laden with poison pills Republicans know Democrats would never support."

  • Earlier today at her weekly press conference, Pelosi said: “Let’s not have a skinny bill when we have a massive problem."

Go deeper: Senate Republicans to vote on skinny bill amid stimulus deadlock

Go deeper

Kamala Harris, the new left's insider

Photo illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios. Photo: Joe Buglewicz/Getty Images     

Progressive leaders see Sen. Kamala Harris, if she's elected vice president, as their conduit to a post-Biden Democratic Party where the power will be in younger, more diverse and more liberal hands.

  • Why it matters: The party's rising left sees Harris as the best hope for penetrating Joe Biden's older, largely white inner circle.

If Biden wins, Harris will become the first woman, first Black American and first Indian American to serve as a U.S. vice president — and would instantly be seen as the first in line for the presidency should Biden decide against seeking a second term.

15 mins ago - Podcasts

How hospitals are prepping for the new COVID-19 surge

Coronavirus cases and hospitalizations are surging, particularly in areas that had been largely spared this spring. One big question now is whether hospitals are better prepared for this new wave, including if they'll be able to continue providing elective services.

Axios Re:Cap digs into what hospitals have, and what they still need, with Lloyd Dean, CEO of CommonSpirit Health, one of America's largest operators of hospitals and health clinics.

Updated 23 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: The good and bad news about antibody therapies — U.S. sets new single-day case record.
  2. Politics: States beg for Warp Speed billions.
  3. World: Taiwan reaches a record 200 days with no local cases.
  4. Education: Surge threatens to shut classrooms down again.
  5. Technology: The pandemic isn't slowing tech.
  6. Travel: CDC replaces COVID-19 cruise ban with less restrictive "conditional sailing order."
  7. Sports: High school football's pandemic struggles.
  8. 🎧Podcast: The vaccine race turns toward nationalism.