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The House voted 219-209 on Friday afternoon to approve a budget resolution that will be used to facilitate passage of President Biden's $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief proposal.

Why it matters: Passing the stimulus package via the budget reconciliation process allows Democrats to sidestep the 60-vote threshold needed in the Senate to approve most major legislation.

  • The Senate passed the resolution at 5:30 a.m. on Friday after 15 hours of overnight debate on amendments.
  • Vice President Harris was the tie-breaking vote for the first time, after senators voted 50-50 along party lines.

What's next: Committees will now begin writing the bill.

  • House Speaker Nancy Pelosi told Democrats in a letter before the vote that they intend to “finish our work” on the relief package before the end of the month.

What they're saying: "[W]e have taken a giant step to begin to fulfill our promise to the American people that a Democratic Senate, a Democratic House and President Biden will have their back and move them forward during this awful crisis," Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) said Friday morning.

  • “Our work to crush the coronavirus and deliver relief to the American people is urgent and of the highest priority,” Pelosi said. “With this budget resolution, we have taken a giant step to save lives and livelihoods.”

Go deeper: Biden holds all the cards in coronavirus relief talks — and he knows it

Go deeper

Updated Feb 5, 2021 - Politics & Policy

Biden after jobs report: "We can't do too much here — we can do too little"

President Biden seized on January's anemic jobs report Friday to argue for his $1.9 trillion relief package, while also bracing the public for the long road to a full economic recovery and robust job growth.

The latest: Biden insisted in a speech from the White House that he would not be cutting the size of the $1,400 per person stimulus checks included in his proposal.

Feb 4, 2021 - Politics & Policy

Chuck Schumer's hell

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Chuck Schumer is fast rediscovering the joys of running a 50-50 Senate: stubborn centrists, irritated base, uncooperative opposition — and virtually no margin for error.

Why it matters: This will be his reality for two years unless he blows up the filibuster. Truth is, managing a divided government is a drag unless you dispense with rules and traditions.

Romney to propose annual cash benefit of $3,000 per child

Photo: Bill Clark-Pool/Getty Images

Sen. Mitt Romney (R-Utah) is proposing a monthly cash benefit totaling $4,200 a year for children ages 0-5 and $3,000 a year for children ages 6-17 as a means of combating child poverty.

Why it matters: White House chief of staff Ron Klain tweeted that he looked forward to seeing the details of Romney's plan, calling it "an encouraging sign that bipartisan action to reduce child poverty IS possible." Thus far, Biden's $1.9 trillion coronavirus stimulus proposal has garnered little Republican support.