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Photo: Drew Angerer via Getty Images

Snapchat will permanently ban President Trump's account on Jan. 20, Axios has learned, after locking it indefinitely last week following the Capitol siege.

Why it matters: The Trump campaign and digital team relied on Snapchat as a key platform to reach younger audiences before the company started limiting its reach in June. The majority of Snapchat's users are under 30.

What's happening: “Last week we announced an indefinite suspension of President Trump’s Snapchat account, and have been assessing what long term action is in the best interest of our Snapchat community," a spokesperson emailed Axios.

  • "In the interest of public safety, and based on his attempts to spread misinformation, hate speech, and incite violence, which are clear violations of our guidelines, we have made the decision to permanently terminate his account.” 

Details: Trump's account in recent months repeatedly broke Snapchat's rules against misinformation, hate speech and glorifying or inciting violence, company sources say.

  • One source tells Axios that the Trump account had attempted to violate policies "dozens of times." After each incident, Snapchat immediately removed his content before it gained much visibility and sent warnings to his team.
  • The move was sparked not just by actions on Snapchat, however, but by Trump's record of inciting violence on other platforms, company sources say. Snapchat leaders felt banning Trump was a matter of broad public safety.

Flashback: Citing the societal effects of Trump's inflammatory rhetoric, Snapchat in June stopped promoting his account in its "Discover" section, which features professional content and content from prominent people.

  • That preemptive action meant that Trump’s account was not visible to Snapchat users unless they chose to subscribe or search for him. 

The big picture: Snapchat follows Twitter, Shopify and a few other platforms in permanently banning Donald Trump's account following last week's events.

  • Last week, Snapchat was the first platform to announce it was indefinitely suspending Trump's account. Many other platforms have put temporary restrictions on his account.

Be smart: Snapchat has been able to avoid most of the regulatory and industry pressure around misinformation, in part because it has stricter standards around the way it polices content.

  • The app has no public newsfeed for unvetted content to go viral and keeps user-generated content physically separated from the professional, vetted content in Snapchat's Discover section.
  • Snapchat also routinely blocks certain keywords, like "Stop the Steal," from showing up in its search bar.

What to watch: The Capitol siege has already begun to ignite a conversation around how social media platforms are structured and monitored.

  • While Snapchat is smaller than platforms like Facebook and Google, its architecture has proven to be effective both in limiting misinformation at scale and preventing bad actors from congregating and planning real-world violence.

Go deeper: Snapchat locks Trump's account amid chaos in Washington

Go deeper

Jan 22, 2021 - Technology

Review of Trump ban marks major turning point for Facebook

Photo Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Facebook's decision to ask its new independent Oversight Board to review the company's indefinite suspension of former President Trump is likely to set a critical precedent for how the social media giant handles political speech from world leaders.

What they're saying: "I very much hope and can expect … that they will uphold our decision," Facebook's VP of global affairs Nick Clegg tells Axios.

Off the Rails

Episode 8: The siege

Photo illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photos: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Beginning on election night 2020 and continuing through his final days in office, Donald Trump unraveled and dragged America with him, to the point that his followers sacked the U.S. Capitol with two weeks left in his term. Axios takes you inside the collapse of a president with a special series.

Episode 8: The siege. An inside account of the deadly insurrection at the Capitol on Jan. 6 that ultimately failed to block the certification of the Electoral College. And, finally, Trump's concession.

On Jan. 6, White House deputy national security adviser Matt Pottinger entered the West Wing in the mid-afternoon, shortly after his colleagues' phones had lit up with an emergency curfew alert from D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser.

Kaine, Collins' censure resolution seeks to bar Trump from holding office again

Sen. Tim Kaine (center) and Sen. Susan Collins (right). Photo: Andrew Harnik/Pool via Getty Images

Sens. Tim Kaine (D-Va.) and Susan Collins (R-Maine) are forging ahead with a draft proposal to censure former President Trump, and are considering introducing the resolution on the Senate floor next week.

Why it matters: Senators are looking for a way to condemn Trump on the record as it becomes increasingly unlikely Democrats will obtain the 17 Republican votes needed to gain a conviction, Axios Alayna Treene writes. "I think it’s important for the Senate's leadership to understand that there are alternatives," Kaine told CNN on Wednesday.