Lead House impeachment manager Adam Schiff (D-Calif.) claimed in his closing arguments during the Senate trial Monday that President Trump cannot be trusted to shun further foreign interference in the election and that voting to remove him from office is the only solution.

Why it matters: Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.), who has said that Trump's campaign to pressure Ukraine to investigate the Bidens was "inappropriate" but not impeachable, suggested on Sunday that the impeachment process will make the president "think twice" about soliciting foreign interference in the future.

  • Sen. Joni Ernst (R-Iowa) also suggested on CNN Sunday that Trump has learned his lesson and that he knows he should go through "proper channels" when trying to "ferret out corruption" in other countries.

What he's saying:

"We must look at the history of this presidency and to the character of this president, or lack of character, and ask: Can we be confident that he will not continue to try to cheat in that very election? Can we be confident that Americans, and not foreign powers, will get to decide, and that the president will shun any further foreign interference in our democratic affairs? And the short, plain, sad, incontestable answer is no, you can't. ... He will not change, and you know it."
— Adam Schiff

Go deeper ... Live updates: Closing arguments begin in impeachment trial

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Hurricane Zeta makes landfall on Louisiana coast as Category 2 storm

A satellite image of Hurricane Zeta. Photo: National Hurricane Center/NOAA

Hurricane Zeta made landfall along the southeastern coast of Louisiana as a Category 2 storm on Wednesday, bringing with it "life-threatening storm surge and strong winds," per the National Hurricane Center.

What's happening: The hurricane was producing maximum sustained winds of nearly 110 mph and stronger gusts.

Updated 57 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Politics: Biden ahead in Wisconsin, Michigan as cases surge in the Midwest.
  2. Health: Surge "is real" and not just caused by more tests, Trump's testing czar saysMask mandates help control rise in hospitalizations Some coronavirus survivors have "autoantibodies."
  3. Business: Surge is sinking consumer confidence Testing is a windfall.
  4. World: Europe faces "stronger and deadlier" coronavirus wave France imposes lockdown as Macron warns of overwhelming second COVID wave Germany to close bars and restaurants for a month.
  5. Sports: Boston Marathon delayed as COVID-19 surges MLB to investigate Dodgers player who joined celebration after positive COVID test.

What the 2020 election means for science

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The 2020 presidential election presents two stark paths for the direction of future-focused scientific research.

Why it matters: Science is a long game, with today's breakthroughs often stemming from research carried out decades ago, often with government help. That means the person who occupies the White House over the next four years will help shape the state of technology for decades into the future.