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Photo: Samsung

In launching the Galaxy S20 line on Tuesday, Samsung zoomed in on the improved picture-taking abilities of its latest flagship smartphones.

Why it matters: The move is an acknowledgment that the camera is the biggest thing that helps spur consumers to buy a new smartphone.

The camera enhancements are a mix of software and hardware changes.

  • On the software side, a new Single Take mode lets people easily capture a combination of videos and stills of key moments.
  • On the hardware side, the S20 and S20+ have 64-megapixel main rear cameras, while the S20 Ultra has a 108-megapixel main camera. The S20 will also support 8K video capture.

Details: The S20 will come in three versions, all of which include 5G capabilities in the U.S.

  • The entry-level S20 will sell for $999 and comes with a 6.2-inch screen and includes support for only low-band flavors of 5G.
  • The S20+ includes a 6.7-inch screen, supports both low-band and millimeter-wave 5G networks, and starts at $1,199.
  • The S20 Ultra has a 6.9-inch screen and adds a nifty 4x optical zoom lens and starts at $1,399.

All models will be available for pre-order on Feb. 21 and arrive in stores March 6.

Meanwhile: The company also detailed a new foldable device, dubbed the Galaxy Z Flip, which it teased in an Oscars commercial on Sunday. The clamshell device will cost around $1,400 and go on sale Feb. 14.

Go deeper: Samsung aims for high note with latest smartphone

Go deeper

2 hours ago - Health

Food banks feel the strain without holiday volunteers

People wait in line at Food Bank Community Kitchen on Nov. 25 in New York City. Photo: Michael Loccisano/Getty Images for Food Bank For New York City

America's food banks are sounding the alarm during this unprecedented holiday season.

The big picture: Soup kitchens and charities, usually brimming with holiday volunteers, are getting far less help.

5 hours ago - Health

AstraZeneca CEO: "We need to do an additional study" on COVID vaccine

Photo: Pavlo Gonchar/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

AstraZeneca CEO Pascal Soriot said on Thursday the company is likely to start a new global trial to measure how effective its coronavirus vaccine is, Bloomberg reports.

Why it matters: Following Phase 3 trials, Oxford and AstraZeneca said their vaccine was 90% effective in people who got a half dose followed by a full dose, and 62% effective in people who got two full doses.

Updated 7 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: Coronavirus cases rose 10% in the week before Thanksgiving.
  2. Politics: Supreme Court backs religious groups on New York coronavirus restrictions.
  3. World: Expert says COVID vaccine likely won't be available in Africa until Q2 of 2021 — Europeans extend lockdowns.
  4. Economy: The winners and losers of the COVID holiday season.
  5. Education: National standardized tests delayed until 2022.