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On June 26, 2015, President Obama's aides lit the White House to celebrate the day's Supreme Court ruling in favor of same-sex marriage. Photo: Mark Wilson/Getty Images

The number of married same-sex households in the U.S. was 568,110 in 2019 — up almost 70% since 2014, the year before the Supreme Court legalized same-sex marriage nationwide, AP notes.

The big picture: 58% of the 980,000 same-sex couple households reported in 2019 were married couples.

  • D.C. had the highest concentration of same-sex households (2.4%), followed by Delaware (1.3%), Oregon (1.2%), Massachusetts (1.2%) and Washington state (1.1%), according to the American Community Survey.

By the numbers:

  • 48: Average age for respondents in same-sex marriages.
  • 47: Average age for their spouses.
  • 82% identified as white.
  • 13%+ were Hispanic.
  • Almost 7% identified themselves as Black.
  • Almost 4% were Asian.
  • 16%+ of same-sex married households were interracial couples, double the rate for opposite-sex married couples.

Go deeper: 850 LGBTQ people are running for office in 2020

Go deeper

Axios-Ipsos poll: Voters of color worry about militias, arrests

Data: Axios/Ipsos poll; Note: ±2.6% margin of error; Chart: Naema Ahmed/Axios

Fears that armed militias, police or COVID-19 await them at the polls are disproportionately shaping how Americans of color think about in-person voting, according to an Ipsos poll for Axios.

Why it matters: Participation by voters of color could decide whether President Trump or Joe Biden wins, and whether Democrats take control of both chambers of Congress.

35 mins ago - World

Putin foe Navalny to be detained for 30 days after returning to Moscow

Russian opposition leader Alexey Navalny. Photo: Oleg Nikishin/Epsilon/Getty Images

Russian opposition leader Alexey Navalny has been ordered to remain in pre-trial detention for 30 days, following his arrest upon returning to Russia on Sunday for the first time since a failed assassination attempt last year.

Why it matters: The detention of Navalny, an anti-corruption activist and the most prominent domestic critic of Russian President Vladimir Putin, has already set off a chorus of condemnations from leaders in Europe and the U.S.

Biden picks Warren allies to lead SEC, CFPB

Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

President-elect Joe Biden has selected FTC commissioner Rohit Chopra to be the next director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) and Obama-era Wall Street regulator Gary Gensler to lead the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC).

Why it matters: Both picks are progressive allies of Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) and viewed as likely to take aggressive steps to regulate big business.