Roger Stone. Photo: Mark Makela/Getty Images

A jury found longtime Trump associate Roger Stone found guilty on seven counts that include obstruction, giving false statements to a House committee and witness tampering on Friday, following the conclusion of a federal trial on charges related to the Mueller investigation.

Context: Stone, 67, was indicted in January. He lied to Congress about his efforts to learn more about when WikiLeaks would publish damaging emails about 2016 Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton.

  • The lies centered on the existence of certain texts and emails, Stone's conversations with Trump campaign officials, and the use of WikiLeaks intermediary that Stone named as comedian Randy Credico.

The big picture: Prosecutors alleged in closing arguments that Stone lied to congressional investigators because he "knew that if this information came out it would look really bad for his longtime associate Donald Trump," the New York Times reports.

  • CNN notes that the most significant revelation from Stone's trial was "the extent to which Stone was in touch with Trump directly and other campaign officials, and how they eagerly anticipated WikiLeaks' releases of hacked Democratic emails in 2016."
  • Those communications also allegedly involved a July 2016 phone conversation between Stone and Trump in which the two discussed future WikiLeaks email dumps, former deputy campaign manager Rick gates testified.

Go deeper: Prosecutors accuse Roger Stone of violating gag order with social media posts

Go deeper

Big Tech marshals a right-leaning army of allies for antitrust fight

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

As tech's giants prepare to face off with antitrust enforcers this summer, they will draw support from an array of predominantly right-leaning defenders ranging from influential former government officials to well-connected think tanks.

The big picture: The Justice Department, the Federal Trade Commission and the states have multiple investigations of monopolistic behavior underway targeting Facebook and Google, with other giants like Amazon and Apple also facing rising scrutiny. Many observers expect a lawsuit against Google to land this summer.

John Roberts' long game

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts is not the revolutionary that conservative activists want him to be.

He moves slower than they want, sides with liberals more than they want, and trims his sails in ways they find maddening. But he is still deeply and unmistakably conservative, pulling the law to the right — at his own pace and in his own image.

1 hour ago - Health

The U.S.' new default coronavirus strategy: herd immunity

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

By letting the coronavirus surge through the population with only minimal social distancing measures in place, the U.S. has accidentally become the world’s largest experiment in herd immunity.

Why it matters: Letting the virus spread while minimizing human loss is doable, in theory. But it requires very strict protections for vulnerable people, almost none of which the U.S. has established.