Feb 7, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Republican Joe Walsh ends presidential campaign

Former Illinois Rep. Joe Walsh announced he is ending his longshot campaign to beat President Trump in the 2020 Republican primaries during an interview with CNN on Friday morning.

What Walsh is saying: "I am ending my candidacy for President of the United States. Look, I got into this because I thought it was really important that there was a Republican, a Republican out there every day calling out this president for how unfit he is. I want to stop Trump. I believe he is a threat to the county. He can't be stopped within the Republican party...It's not a party. It's a cult."

The state of play: Multiple states canceled their GOP primaries, making it essentially impossible for Walsh or any Republican primary candidate to gain a foothold.

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Joe Walsh on the issues, in under 500 words

Joe Walsh holds a news conference after his election to Congress in November 2010. Photo: Bill Clark/Roll Call)

Editor's Note: Walsh dropped out of the race on Feb. 7, 2020. Below is our original article on his candidacy. He is the second Republican to drop his challenge.

Former Illinois Rep. Joe Walsh, who claimed he "helped create Trump" while announcing his candidacy in late August, is 1 of 3 long-shot Republicans running against the president for 2020. Walsh is pro-impeachment, but his previous support for Trump could complicate his popularity among "Never Trump" Republicans.

Go deeperArrowUpdated Feb 7, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Rep. Doug Collins confirms Georgia Senate run, triggering GOP battle

Rep. Doug Collins. Photo: Patrick Semansky-Pool/Getty Images

Georgia Rep. Doug Collins told "Fox & Friends" Wednesday he will challenge Sen. Kelly Loeffler, another Republican, for her seat in the state's election this year.

Why it matters: Collins' announcement has "sparked an intraparty Republican brawl between a top defender of President Trump and a business executive who was appointed to the post by Republican Gov. Brian Kemp," the Washington Post writes.

Go deeperArrowJan 29, 2020

Republicans and Democrats react to Mitt Romney voting to convict Trump

Romney and Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.) at Trump's State of the Union address on Feb. 4. Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

After Sen. Mitt Romney (R-Utah) voted to convict President Trump for abuse of power in the impeachment trial Wednesday, Republicans doubled down to rebuke the senator while Democrats rushed to his defense.

What he's saying: "I am aware that there are people in my party and in my state who will strenuously disapprove of my decision, and in some quarters, I will be vehemently denounced," Romney said on the Senate floor Wednesday. "I am sure to hear abuse from the President and his supporters."

Go deeperArrowUpdated Feb 6, 2020 - Politics & Policy