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A Remington shotguns display in Dallas. Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Remington Arms Company filed for bankruptcy protection on Monday despite a recent surge in gun sales amid the coronavirus pandemic and anti-racism protests, per the Wall Street Journal.

Why it matters: The 204-year-old firm is considered America's oldest gun-maker. Its Chapter 11 filing in the U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Decatur, Alabama, marks the second time since 2018 that it's filed for bankruptcy. Remington was facing a wrongful death lawsuit from families of the 2012 Sandy Hook school shooting victims. The second bankruptcy filing was prompted by a "struggle to pay legal fees and the high interest payments on its debt," the New York Times notes.

Flashback: What happened to Remington?

Go deeper

FBI conducted record number of firearm checks this year

An employee at SP Firearms Unlimited in Franklin Square, New York, in August. Photo: Mike Pont/Getty Images

The FBI has processed more gun background checks in 2020 than in any other year on record, according to data the agency released Tuesday. Over 32 million guns were processed through the end of October.

The big picture: Gun sales in the U.S. spiked significantly in March when the coronavirus pandemic first began to spread in earnest across the country, per the New York Times.

1 hour ago - World

Hong Kong media tycoon Jimmy Lai detained on fraud charge

An activist holds a placard highlighting China's Tiananmen Square massacre as pro-democracy media tycoon Jimmy Lai arrives at West Kowloon Magistrates' Court in Hong Kong in November. Photo: Isaac Wong/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Hong Kong media tycoon Jimmy Lai is being detained until an April court hearing after the pro-democracy supporter was charged Thursday with fraud, per his Apple Daily news outlet.

Why it matters: The 72-year-old's arrest and denial of bail is another blow for the pro-democracy movement in the former British colony amid concerns about a fresh crackdown on activists.

5 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Inhofe loudly sets Trump straight on defense bill

Sen. Jim Inhofe speaks with reporters in the Capitol last month. Photo: Samuel Corum/Getty Images

Senator Jim Inhofe told President Trump today he'll likely fail to get two big wishes in pending defense spending legislation, bellowing into his cellphone: "This is the only chance to get our bill passed," a source who overheard part of their conversation tells Axios.

Why it matters: Republicans are ready to test whether Trump's threats of vetoing the bill, which has passed every year for more than half a century, are empty.