Dec 12, 2019

Sandy Hook lawsuit against gunmaker set to go to trial in 2021

A 2017 vigil for the Sandy Hook masracre victims in Newtown, Connecticut. Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

A Connecticut judge said Wednesday a wrongful death lawsuit brought by families of the 2012 Sandy Hook school shooting victims against gunmaker Remington Arms would go to trial in September 2021, the Hartford Courant first reported.

Why it matters: The case is set to test a 2005 law protecting weapons manufacturers from being held accountable for crimes committed by gun buyers. The Supreme Court said last month it wouldn't intervene in the state-level suit.

Go deeper: Supreme Court allows Sandy Hook lawsuit to move forward

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Newtown High School wins state football championship on anniversary of Sandy Hook shooting

Newtown's Ben Pinto (#42). Photo: Kassi Jackson/Hartford Courant via AP

Newtown, Conn., marked the seventh anniversary of the massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School with a moment of joy when the high school football team — with a shooting victim's brother as linebacker — won the state championship Saturday in a last-minute thrill, AP reports.

The big picture: The Newtown High School Nighthawks won the Class LL state championship on a 36-yard touchdown pass as time expired, beating Darien 13-7.

Go deeperArrowDec 16, 2019

Judge orders Alex Jones and InfoWars to pay $100,000 in Sandy Hook case

Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images.

A Texas judge ordered conspiracy theorist Alex Jones and his website InfoWars on Monday to pay $100,000 in court costs and legal fees in a case brought forward by a Sandy Hook family, the Daily Beast reports.

Catch up quick: Jones has repeatedly spread unsubstantiated conspiracies about the 2012 Sandy Hook Elementary School massacre, in which 26 people died, including 20 children. Multiple families affected by the tragedy have sued Jones over the circulations.

Go deeperArrowDec 31, 2019

Supreme Court to decide on release of Trump’s financial records

President Trump. Photo: BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI / Contributor/Getty Images

The Supreme Court agreed on Friday to take on three cases involving President Trump's finances to determine whether he can block the release of his records.

Why it matters: The court's ruling could give the American public a look at the president's finances after he has gone to great lengths to keep them under wraps.

Go deeperArrowDec 13, 2019