Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Minneapolis-St. Paul

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa-St. Petersburg news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa-St. Petersburg

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Attorney General Bill Barr before addressing a summit in Washington, DC, in Marc. Photo: Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images

Attorney General Bill Barr is set to accuse House Judiciary Committee Democrats of trying to discredit him over his investigations into the origins of the FBI's Russia probe when he appears before the panel Tuesday.

Details: In prepared remarks released Monday, Barr states that since he announced his investigation into what he calls "the grave abuses involved in the bogus 'Russiagate' scandal, many of the Democrats on this Committee have attempted to discredit" him by "conjuring up a narrative" that he's simply President Trump's "factotum who disposes of criminal cases according to his instructions."

  • "Judging from the letter inviting me to this hearing, that appears to be your agenda today," he will add.

What else he's saying: Barr also plans to address protests across the U.S. and the controversial deployment of federal agents in cities where there's been unrest.

  • "Largely absent from these scenes of destruction are even superficial attempts by the rioters to connect their actions to George Floyd's death or any legitimate call for reform," he will say. "Nor could such brazen acts of lawlessness plausibly be justified by a concern that police officers in Minnesota or elsewhere defied the law."

"As elected officials of the federal government, every Member of this Committee — regardless of your political views or your feelings about the Trump Administration— should condemn violence against federal officers and destruction of federal property. So should state and local leaders who have a responsibility to keep their communities safe. To tacitly condone destruction and anarchy is to abandon the basic rule-of-law principles that should unite us even in a politically divisive time."

Excerpt from Barr's opening remarks

Read the full statement via DocumentCloud:

Editor's note: This article has been updated with Barr's comments on the protests.

Go deeper

Scoop: Trump's spy chief releases new batch of Russia docs to Justice Department

Photo: Andrew Harnik-Pool/Getty Images

Director of National Intelligence John Ratcliffe has approved the release to the Department of Justice of a large binder full of documents to assist a review of the Obama administration's handling of the Trump-Russia investigation, according to a source with direct knowledge of the materials and confirmed by Ratcliffe.

Why it matters: The release, which is being revealed publicly for the first time today, comes as President Trump is urging his agencies to expedite the release of materials that he believes will be politically advantageous to him.

Ex-officer charged in George Floyd's death freed on $1 million bond

Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin. Photo: Hennepin County Sheriff's Office

Derek Chauvin, the former Minneapolis police officer charged with murder in the death of George Floyd, was released from jail on Wednesday after posting a $1 million bond, court documents show.

Why it matters: The May killing of George Floyd, an unarmed Black man, set off months of protests and unrest across the U.S. Video of the incident shows Chauvin pinning Floyd's neck to the ground with his knee for eight minutes and 46 seconds as the handcuffed Black man cried out, "I can't breathe," before going unresponsive.

Felix Salmon, author of Capital
Updated 4 mins ago - Economy & Business

How central banks can save the world

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

The trillion-dollar gap between actual GDP and potential GDP is a gap made up of misery, unemployment, and unfulfilled promise. It's also a gap that can be eradicated — if central banks embrace unconventional monetary policy.

  • That's the message from Eric Lonergan and Megan Greene, two economists who reject the idea that central banks have hit a "lower bound" on interest rates. In fact, they reject the idea that "interest rates" are a singular thing at all, and they fullthroatedly reject the idea — most recently put forward by New York Fed president Bill Dudley — that the Fed is "out of firepower."

Why it matters: If Lonergan and Greene are right, then central banks have effectively unlimited ammunition in their fight to increase inflation and employment. They are limited only by political will.