Nov 21, 2019

Putin addresses U.S. impeachment inquiry, 2020 interference

Putin in the Siberian Taiga forest in October. Photo: Kremlin Press Service/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Russian President Vladimir Putin appeared to address the impeachment inquiry on Wednesday when he told an economic forum in Moscow the "internal political struggles" in the U.S. are having a "negative effect" on American relations with Russia.

Hopefully, no one accuses us of election interferences in the United States. Now they're accusing Ukraine. Well, let them deal with that themselves."
— Vladimir Putin's remarks at the Russia Calling summit

The big picture: At the VTB Capital Investment Forum "Russia Calling," Putin also said Russia had "many common interests with the United States," which he described as a "great power" and called accusations that his country was a threat as a "hoax."

Zoom out: The heads of U.S. government agencies including the FBI, Department of Justice and National Security Agency warned in a joint security statement this month that foreign actors would seek to interfere in the 2020 election. Among the countries named was Russia.

Watch Putin speak at the f0rum:

  • His remarks on the U.S., as translated into English by an interpreter, occur at 52:34 in the Ruptly video below.

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20 Years of Putin: The pinnacle of power and the fear of losing it

Photo illustration: Eniola Odetunde. Photos via Mikhail Svetlov/Getty Images

Twenty years ago, on New Year's Eve 1999, a political newcomer and former KGB operative named Vladimir Putin suddenly assumed the Russian presidency.

Part two of our "20 Years of Putin" special report examines what he has built, and what will happen to it when he's gone. It's based on conversations with exiled oligarch Mikhail Khodorkovsky, three former U.S. ambassadors to Moscow, leading experts and former chiefs of the Pentagon and CIA. Read part one.

Go deeperArrowUpdated Dec 6, 2019

20 Years of Putin: Tracing his rise from KGB to Kremlin

Photo Illustration: Eniola Odetunde. Photos via Mikhail Svetlov/Getty Images

Twenty years ago today, on New Year's Eve 1999, a political newcomer and former KGB operative named Vladimir Putin suddenly assumed the Russian presidency.

Part 1 of our "20 Years of Putin" special report focuses on his rise, his early years and his escalating antagonism with the West. It's based on conversations with Mikhail Khodorkovsky — the oligarch whose imprisonment in 2003 revealed Putin's ruthlessness to the world — three former U.S. ambassadors to Moscow, leading experts and former chiefs of the Pentagon and CIA. Read part 2.

Dive inArrowUpdated Dec 31, 2019 - World

Senators briefed that CrowdStrike theory is Russian-backed disinformation campaign

Fiona Hill, former official at the National Security Council specialising in the former Soviet Union and Russian and European affairs, at her hearing on the impeachment of President Trump. Photo: Michael Brochstein / Echoes Wire / Barcroft Media via Getty Images

Intelligence officials recently briefed senators and their aides on Russian efforts to pin interference in the 2016 U.S. election on Ukraine, the New York Times reports.

Why it matters: As part of their defense of President Trump amid the impeachment inquiry, Republicans have tried to advance the now-debunked conspiracy theory that the government in Kiev was responsible for hacking the 2016 election.

Go deeperArrowNov 22, 2019