Putin in the Siberian Taiga forest in October. Photo: Kremlin Press Service/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Russian President Vladimir Putin appeared to address the impeachment inquiry on Wednesday when he told an economic forum in Moscow the "internal political struggles" in the U.S. are having a "negative effect" on American relations with Russia.

Hopefully, no one accuses us of election interferences in the United States. Now they're accusing Ukraine. Well, let them deal with that themselves."
— Vladimir Putin's remarks at the Russia Calling summit

The big picture: At the VTB Capital Investment Forum "Russia Calling," Putin also said Russia had "many common interests with the United States," which he described as a "great power" and called accusations that his country was a threat as a "hoax."

Zoom out: The heads of U.S. government agencies including the FBI, Department of Justice and National Security Agency warned in a joint security statement this month that foreign actors would seek to interfere in the 2020 election. Among the countries named was Russia.

Watch Putin speak at the f0rum:

  • His remarks on the U.S., as translated into English by an interpreter, occur at 52:34 in the Ruptly video below.

Go deeper:

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