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Photo by Leigh Vogel/Getty Images

The 2019 Pulitzer Prize winners were announced Monday after initially being postponed due to the coronavirus.

The big winner: The New York Times was awarded the most prizes, including in major categories like investigative reporting, international reporting and commentary.

Full list of winners in journalism and descriptions of their awards, via The Pulitzer Board:

Public Service (1917-present)

  • Winner: Anchorage Daily News in collaboration with ProPublica on a lack of police coverage in many communities.

Breaking News Reporting (1998-present)

  • Winner: The Louisville Courier-Journal for its rapid coverage of hundreds of last-minute pardons by Kentucky's governor.

Investigative Reporting (1985-present)

  • Winner: Brian Rosenthal of the New York Times for an expose of NYC's taxi industry that showed how lenders profited from predatory loans that shattered the lives of drivers.

Explanatory Reporting (1998-present)

  • Winner: The Washington Post for a series that showed the dire effects of extreme temperatures on the planet.

Local Reporting (1948-1952, 2007-present)

  • Winner: The staff of the Baltimore Sun, for impactful reporting on a lucrative undisclosed financial relationship between the city's mayor and the public hospital system she helped to oversee.

National Reporting (1948-present)

  • Winner: T. Christian Miller, Megan Rose, and Robert Faturechi of ProPublica for their investigation into America’s 7th Fleet after a series of deadly naval accidents in the Pacific.
  • Winner: Dominic Gates, Mike Baker, Steve Miletich and Lewis Kamb of The Seattle Times for expansive reporting that exposed the Boeing 737 Max controversy.

International Reporting (1948-present)

  • Winner: The New York Times for a set of stories exposing the predations of Vladimir Putin's regime.

Feature Writing (1979-present)

  • Winner: Ben Taub of The New Yorker on a story about living in the shadows in Guantanamo Bay.

Commentary (1973-present)

  • Winner: Nikole Hannah-Jones of the New York Times for the groundbreaking 1619 Project.

Criticism (1973-present)

  • Winner: Christopher Knight of the Los Angeles Times on a story on the overhaul of the Los Angeles Museum of Art.

Editorial Writing (1917-present)

  • Winner: Jeffery Gerritt of the Palestine, Texas, Herald-Press for editorials that exposed how pre-trial inmates died horrific deaths in a small Texas county jail.

Editorial Cartooning (1922-present)

  • Winner: Barry Blitt, contributor to The New Yorker, for work that skewers the personalities and policies emanating from the Trump White House.

Breaking News Photography (2000-present)

  • Winner: The photography staff of Reuters for illuminating photographs of the Hong Kong protests.

Feature Photography (1968-present)

  • Winner: Channi Anand, Mukhtar Khan and Dar Yasin of The Associated Press for striking images of the strife in the contested territory of Kashmir.

Audio Reporting (2020-present)

  • Winner: Staff of This American Life, with Molly O'Toole of the Los Angeles Times and Emily Green, freelancer, Vice News, for “The Out Crowd,” which illuminates the personal impact of the Trump administration’s “Remain in Mexico” policy.

Between the lines: In the past, the Pulitzers have been announced from Columbia University's journalism school, but "this year is different," Pulitzer Prize administrator Dana Canedy noted during the virtual announcements.

  • "It goes without saying that today we announce the Pulitzer winners in deeply challenging times."
  • Ironically, Canedy noted, the first time the Pulitzers were awarded was less than a year before the outbreak of the Spanish flu.

Go deeper:

Go deeper

Updated 2 hours ago - Technology

Twitter sues Texas AG Ken Paxton

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton at February's Conservative Political Action Conference in Orlando, Florida. Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Twitter on Monday filed a lawsuit against Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton (R), saying that his office launched an investigation into the social media giant because it banned former President Trump from its platform.

Driving the news: Twitter is seeking to halt an investigation launched by Paxton into moderation practices by Big Tech firms including Twitter for what he called "the seemingly coordinated de-platforming of the President," days after they banned him following the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection.

6 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Senate retirements could attract GOP troublemakers

Sen. Roy Blunt (R-Mo.). Photo: Jim Lo Scalzo/EPA/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Sen. Roy Blunt's retirement highlights the twin challenge facing Senate Republicans: finding good replacement candidates and avoiding a pathway for potential troublemakers to join their ranks.

Why it matters: While the midterm elections are supposed to be a boon to the party out of power, the recent run of retirements — which may not be over — is upending that assumption for the GOP in 2022.

Congressional diversity growing - slowly

Data: Brookings Institution and Pew Research Center; Note: No data on Native Americans in Congress before the 107th Congress; Chart: Danielle Alberti/Axios

The number of non-white senators and House members in the 535-seat Congress has been growing steadily in the past several decades — but representation largely lags behind the overall U.S. population.

Why it matters: Non-whites find it harder to break into the power system because of structural barriers such as the need to quit a job to campaign full time for office, as Axios reported in its latest Hard Truths Deep Dive.

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