Diana Diller used the pregnancy-tracking app Ovia to track her pregnancy. Photo: Philip Cheung for The Washington Post via Getty Images

As apps to monitor moms' health proliferate, employers and insurers can pay to keep tabs on the vast data, the Washington Post's Drew Harwell reports.

Why it matters: An employer can pay "to gain access to the intimate details of its workers’ personal lives, from their trying-to-conceive months to early motherhood."

How it works: Employers can pay an app developer to offer workers a special version that relays health data in "de-identified," aggregated form, per The Post.

  • Companies say the data can help minimize health care spending and discover medical problems.
  • "Period and pregnancy-tracking apps ... have climbed in popularity ... and many expectant women check in daily to see, for instance, how their unborn babies’ size compares to different fruits or Parisian desserts."

Go deeper: Facebook tracks pregnancy status, menstrual cycle through apps

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Obama: The rest of us have to live with the consequences of what Trump's done

Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Campaigning for Joe Biden at a car rally in Miami on Saturday, Barack Obama railed against President Trump's response to the coronavirus pandemic, saying "the rest of us have to live with the consequences of what he's done."

Driving the news: With less than two weeks before the election, the Biden campaign is drawing on the former president's popularity with Democrats to drive turnout and motivate voters.

Murkowski says she'll vote to confirm Amy Coney Barrett to Supreme Court

Sen. Lisa Murkowski. Photo: Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images

Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) said Saturday that she'll vote to confirm Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court on Monday, despite her opposition to the process that's recently transpired.

The big picture: Murkowski's decision leaves Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) as the only Republican expected to vote against Barrett.