Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg. Photo: Christophe Morin/IP3/Getty Images

Wall Street Journal testing revealed that at least 11 popular apps, with millions of downloads to date, have been sharing highly personal data with Facebook.

Details: When users share their body weight, blood pressure, menstrual cycle, or pregnancy status with certain apps, that information is sent to Facebook and often matched with the Facebook profile of that user. At least 6 of the top 15 health and fitness apps in Apple’s iOS store — including iFlo Period & Ovulation Tracker and Instant Heart Rate: HR Monitor — sent sensitive user data to Facebook immediately after the information was collected. Per the WSJ, these apps frequently send this data without any disclosure to users.

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Updated 9 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 7:30 a.m. ET: 11,093,182 — Total deaths: 525,491 — Total recoveries — 5,890,052Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 7:30 a.m. ET: 2,795,163 — Total deaths: 129,437 — Total recoveries: 790,404 — Total tested: 34,213,497Map.
  3. States: ICU beds in Arizona's hot spot reach near capacity.
  4. Public health: The states where face coverings are mandatory Fauci says it has been a "very disturbing week" for the spread of the coronavirus in the U.S.
  5. Economy: The economy may recover just quickly enough to kill political interest in more stimulus.

Kimberly Guilfoyle tests positive for coronavirus

Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

Kimberly Guilfoyle, Donald Trump Jr.'s partner and a top fundraising official for the Trump campaign, tested positive for the coronavirus on Friday, The New York Times reports.

Why it matters: Guilfoyle is the third person in President Trump’s circle known to have contracted the coronavirus. Vice President Mike Pence's press secretary tested positive, as did a personal valet who served Trump food.

America's exceptionally uneventful Fourth of July

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Amateur fireworks and small backyard cookouts are winning the weekend as the coronavirus takes the flash out of the Fourth of July.

What's happening: Public parades and fireworks displays around much of the country are being cancelled to prevent mass gatherings where the virus could spread. Hot-dog contests and concerts will play to empty stands and virtual audiences — all while American pride treads an all-time low.