A protester flies an American flag while walking through tear gas fired by federal officers during a protest in front of the Mark O. Hatfield U.S. Courthouse in Portland, Oregon, on July 21. Photo: Nathan Howard/Getty Images

Protests persisted in Portland, Oregon Tuesday night as federal law enforcement officers in camouflage again discharged tear gas in response to ongoing civil unrest following the May 25 death of Minneapolis man George Floyd.

Why it matters: While most of the U.S. has seen a slowdown in demonstrations after weeks of Black Lives Matter protests, Portland has shown continued momentum for the cause.

The state of play: Following criticism the Trump administration's action in Portland amid reports that federal law enforcement officers in unmarked vehicles detained Portland protesters without explanation, Acting Homeland Security Secretary Chad Wolf said federal agents "will not retreat" from the city.

  • The U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon called for an inspector general investigation into those reports Friday. Oregon Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum said Friday night that her office opened a criminal investigation into the events that surrounded one protester's injuries. She filed another suit in Federal District Court in pursuit of a restraining order, accusing federal agents of unlawful tactics.

A look at the scene:

Federal officers operate amid tear gas while clearing the street in front of the Mark O. Hatfield U.S. Courthouse on in Portland, Oregon, on July 21. Photo by Paula Bronstein/Getty Images
Protesters chat gathered in front of the Mark O. Hatfield U.S. Courthouse on July 20. Photo: Paula Bronstein/Getty Images
Protesters in front of the Multnomah County Justice Center on July 18. Photo: Ankur Dholakia/AFP via Getty Images
Protestors gather en masse to express outrage over federal interference on July 18. Photo: Ankur Dholakia/AFP via Getty Images
Federal officers preparing to disperse a crowd of protestors on July 18. Photo: Mason Trinca/Getty Images
A protester spray painting in front of the the U.S. District Court building on July 18. Photo: Mason Trinca/Getty Images
Protesters stationed outside the Multnomah County Justice Center on July 18. Photo: Mason Trinca/Getty Images
Tear gas being deployed on the steps of the U.S. District Court building on July 18. Photo: Mason Trinca/Getty Images
Protestors prepare for conflict with federal law enforcement on July 18. Photo: Mason Trinca/Getty Images

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Updated Sep 13, 2020 - Energy & Environment

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Deadly wildfires sweeping the West have displaced tens of thousands of people, per AP, as officials in Oregon warn of a "mass fatality event."

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Biden: The next president should decide on Ginsburg’s replacement

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Joe Biden is calling for the winner of November's presidential election to select Ruth Bader Ginsburg's replacement on the Supreme Court.

What he's saying: "[L]et me be clear: The voters should pick the president and the president should pick the justice for the Senate to consider," Biden said. "This was the position the Republican Senate took in 2016 when there were almost 10 months to go before the election. That's the position the United States Senate must take today, and the election's only 46 days off.

Trump, McConnell to move fast to replace Ginsburg

Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

President Trump will move within days to nominate his third Supreme Court justice in just three-plus short years — and shape the court for literally decades to come, top Republican sources tell Axios.

Driving the news: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Senate Republicans are ready to move to confirm Trump's nominee before Election Day, just 46 days away, setting up one of the most consequential periods of our lifetimes, the sources say.