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Sen. Chuck Grassley departs from the Senate floor after a vote in Washington on June 8, 2021. Photo: Caroline Brehman/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

The majority of likely Iowa voters say it's time for someone new to take over Sen. Chuck Grassley's seat, according to the latest Des Moines Register/Mediacom Iowa Poll.

Why it matters: Grassley's seat has been viewed as so invincible in the past, electability polls haven't been conducted prior to an election cycle, said J. Ann Selzer, who ran the Iowa Poll.

  • But Iowa's reliably red seat now appears "vincible," Selzer said.

By the numbers: 64% of likely voters said they believe someone new should hold Grassley's seat.

  • 37% of those are Republicans, 89% Democrats and 68% are independents.

Yes, but: If Grassley decides to run again, he will still hold a strong advantage over any competitor because of his name recognition and long incumbency.

  • 27% of likely voters said they would reelect Grassley — the majority (51%) of whom are Republicans.

Between the lines: Though the 87-year-old senator is a household name, there's growing sentiment that Iowa's longest-serving has been in office long enough.

What they're saying: "He still does care about the people and the farmers," Dawn Leiser, a 46-year-old independent, told the Register. "It's just that we need to get fresher and newer blood unfortunately."

Methodology: 630 likely voters were polled about the 2022 midterm elections from June 13-16. The poll's margin of error is plus or minus 3.9 percentage points.

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Go deeper

Swing voters oppose Texas abortion law

Protesters at a rally at the Texas State Capitol. Photo: Jordan Vonderhaar/Getty Images

All 10 swing voters in Axios’ latest focus groups — including those who described themselves as "pro-life" — said they oppose Texas' new anti-abortion law.

Why it matters: If their responses reflect larger patterns in U.S. society, this could hurt Republicans with women and independents in next year's midterm elections. The swing voters cited overreach, invasion of privacy and concerns about frivolous lawsuits jamming up the courts.

Swing voters' split feelings about Afghanistan

An Afghanistan flag waves in front of the U.S. Capitol on Aug. 28. Photo: Liz Lynch/Getty Images

Some swing voters say they're deeply disappointed with the execution of the U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan.

Yes, but: They don't believe former President Trump would have handled it better than President Biden, and the issue is far less important to them than getting the pandemic under control.

Sep 16, 2021 - Politics & Policy

The debt ceiling stare down

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Congress is fast approaching its deadline to raise the debt ceiling or risk defaulting on the nation's debt, and, as of now, there's no serious plan to stave off what many members are calling the worst-case scenario.

Why it matters: The U.S. has never defaulted on its debt. If Congress doesn't take "extraordinary measures" to finance the government, it would "likely cause irreparable damage to the U.S. economy and global financial markets," Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen warned last week.

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