Dec 12, 2019

Planned Parenthood to open clinics in 50 Los Angeles high schools

A California high school in 2018. Photo: Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Planned Parenthood announced Wednesday it's opening 50 clinics for some 75,000 teenagers at Los Angeles County high schools that'll offer a range of reproductive services, but not abortions, the Washington Post first reported.

Why it matters: It's the latest example of California officials working with Planned Parenthood as the reproductive health care provider faces Trump administration efforts to restrict its services and cut funding. In October, California became the first state to require public colleges provide abortion medication to students on campus.

The big picture: Per WashPost, Planned Parenthood's partnership with the school district and county health department is set to offer a "full range of birth control options, testing and treatment for sexually transmitted infections, and pregnancy counseling."

  • Organizers plan to train hundreds of youths as "peer advocates" to offer information on "safe sex and relationships," the Post notes.
  • The wellbeing centers will be rolled out over two years and also provide mental health support, according to MyNewsLA.com.

What they're saying: "Wellbeing centers provide students a safe space to receive information and resources on substance use prevention, sexual health and mental health," County Supervisor Hilda Solis told the Los Angeles news outlet.

  • Sister Paula Vandegaer, head of Volunteers for Life, told WashPost she's against the program because it "pushes sexuality beyond where they should without reference to families."

By the numbers: The program is "funded by an initial investment of $10 million from Los Angeles County and $6 million from Planned Parenthood over three years," the Post reports.

Go deeper: California sex education overhaul

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Medicare for All's missing mental health discussion

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

America's mental health care system is in dire need of an overhaul, but the any real specifics are largely missing from the 2020 debate about health care.

Why it matters: Suicide and drug overdose rates continue to rise, and the U.S. faces a shortage of mental health providers and a lack of access to treatment.

Go deeperArrowJan 8, 2020

Tunisia becomes only Arab country with sex education in primary school

A girl holds a Tunisian flag as she watches a FIFA World Cup 2018 soccer match, June 28, 2018. Photo: Chedly Ben Ibrahim/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Tunisia is the first Arab country to provide a sex education program for elementary and middle school students, the Washington Post reports.

Why it matters: The education program will be integrated into a variety of school subjects such as Arabic and the sciences. Children will learn about their bodies in a "biological and religious-based way" to arm them against sexual harassment, catcalling, rape and molestation, the Post writes. Older students will learn about pregnancy and abortion.

Go deeperArrowDec 19, 2019

Harvey Weinstein indicted on sex crimes in Los Angeles

Harvey Weinstein leaving a New York City court, Jan. 6. Photo: Kena Betancur/Getty Images

Harvey Weinstein was indicted Monday on sex crimes charges by prosecutors in Los Angeles, per AP.

The state of play: The new indictment came just hours after the start of Weinstein's separate New York trial on similar charges.

Go deeperArrowJan 6, 2020