Updated Jul 11, 2018

In photos: NATO leaders come together in Brussels

Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images

The leaders of the 29 NATO countries kicked off their annual summit in Brussels today.

The big picture: President Trump continued to posture himself against some of the United States' biggest allies, calling on them to significantly increase their contributions to the alliance and singling out Germany with controversial criticisms.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel and Trump make a statement to the press after a bilateral meeting. Photo by Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images.
France's President Emmanuel Macron jokes with President Trump. Photo by Tatyana Zenkovich/AFP/Getty Images.
From left: NATO U.S. Representative Kay Bailey Hutchison, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, Secretary of Defense James Mattis, National Security Advisor John Bolton and Britain's new Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt. Photo: Geoffroy van der Hasselt/AFP/Getty Images.
French President's wife Brigitte Macron and First Lady Melania Trump look on during a musical performance. Photo: Riccardo Pareggani/AFP/Getty Images.

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