Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa Bay news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Charlotte news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

President Trump arrives today at the annual NATO summit in Brussels fixated on the fact that most members are falling short of defense spending targets, going so far as to declare that the current state of affairs "just doesn't work" for the U.S.

Expand chart
Data: NATO; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

The bigger picture: Trump isn't the first president to push Europe on defense spending, but the 2% figure only tells part of the story.

By the numbers...
  • 29 countries across Europe, the U.S. and Canada comprise the NATO alliance. 12 original members joined in 1949, and Montenegro became the newest member last year.
  • 62,635 U.S. troops were based in Europe as of 2016, with about half of those in Germany and Italy and the U.K. also hosting large numbers.
  • On the agenda for this week: The "readiness initiative" that would, per CSIS, "ensure NATO has 30 battalions, 30 combat vessels, and 30 air squadrons ready within 30 days.
The spending picture...
  • 1.45% of GDP, across all non-U.S. NATO members, is invested in defense.
  • 5 members (rounding up for Poland) met the 2% threshold last year. 3 more plan to by year’s end, and 15 have presented plans to get to 2% by the 2024 deadline.
  • 72% of all defense spending among NATO members comes from the U.S. The next biggest spenders — the U.K., France and Germany — together spend 20% of the U.S. total.
  • 11 of the 29 members spend the targeted 20% of their military budget on equipment (rather than, say, military pensions), while several countries — like Slovenia and Belgium — fall far short.
Approval of NATO...
  • 62% of Americans have a favorable view of NATO, per Pew. That’s right at the median among member states.
  • 78% of Democrats have a favorable view, up from 58% in 2016. 47% of Republicans approve.
  • 79% in Poland and the Netherlands have favorable views, the highest rate. The lowest approval comes in Turkey (23%) and Greece (27%).
The Russia question...
  • 60+% in Greece, Italy, Germany, Spain and the U.K. say they’d expect the U.S. to use military force if Russia got into serious military conflict with a NATO ally, per Pew, while less than 50% (and just 25% in Greece) say they’d expect their country’s military to take part. Those numbers are more balanced in France, Canada and Poland.
  • 28 of 29 members reduced trade with Russia between 2012 and 2016 amid a series of sanctions, per CSIS. The exception is Croatia.
  • 22 of 29 NATO members have increased defense spending since 2014, when Russia’s annexation of Crimea spurred increased urgency among members. One exception: the U.S.

Go deeper: Despite Trump’s attacks on NATO members, U.S. support also down.

Go deeper

In cyber espionage, U.S. is both hunted and hunter

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

American outrage over foreign cyber espionage, like Russia's SolarWinds hack, obscures the uncomfortable reality that the U.S. secretly does just the same thing to other countries.

Why it matters: Secrecy is often necessary in cyber spying to protect sources and methods, preserve strategic edges that may stem from purloined information, and prevent diplomatic incidents.

35 mins ago - Politics & Policy
Scoop

White House plots "full-court press" for $1.9 trillion relief plan

National Economic Council Director Brian Deese speaks during a White House news briefing. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

The Biden White House is deploying top officials to get a wide ideological spectrum of lawmakers, governors and mayors on board with the president’s $1.9 trillion COVID relief proposal, according to people familiar with the matter.

Why it matters: The broad, choreographed effort shows just how crucially Biden views the stimulus to the nation's recovery and his own political success.

35 mins ago - World

Scoop: Sudan wants to seal Israel normalization deal at White House

Burhan. Photo: Mazen Mahdi/AFP via Getty

Three months after Sudan agreed to normalize relations with Israel, it still hasn't signed an agreement to formally do so. Israeli officials tell me one reason has now emerged: Sudan wants to sign the deal at the White House.

Driving the news: Israel sent Sudan a draft agreement for establishing diplomatic relations several weeks ago, but the Sudanese didn’t reply, the officials say. On Tuesday, Israeli Minister of Intelligence Eli Cohen raised that issue in Khartoum during the first-ever visit of an Israeli minister to Sudan.