Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Vice President Mike Pence told "CBS Evening News" on Monday that President Trump has "an obligation under the Constitution" to put forward a nominee to replace the late Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

The state of play: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) has vowed to give Trump's nominee a vote, despite opposing then-President Obama's nomination of Merrick Garland following Justice Antonin Scalia's death in 2016, on the grounds that voters should decide in the next election who is appointed to the court.

  • Pence said the circumstances have changed since 2016 because the same party now holds control of the White House and the Senate.

What else he's saying: "President Trump believes that he has an obligation under the Constitution of the United States to put forward a nominee for the Supreme Court," Pence said Monday.

  • "There have been 29 times that there have been vacancies since George Washington through Barack Obama. In all 29 cases, the president has made a nomination to the Supreme Court during an election year. And President Trump believes that it's his responsibility and his duty to do that again."

Worth noting: Ginsburg's death — coming 46 days before Election Day — is the second-shortest amount of time between an opening on the court and an election, behind only the vacancy caused by Justice Robert Taney's death in October 1846, CBS News notes.

Where it stands: Two GOP senators — Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) and Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) — have said they oppose holding a vote before the election. That means two more defections would force McConnell to delay until at least the lame-duck session of Congress.

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Senate advances Amy Coney Barrett nomination, setting up final confirmation vote

Photo: Xinhua/Ting Shen via Getty Images

The Senate voted 51-48 on Sunday to advance the Supreme Court nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett, setting up a final confirmation vote for Monday.

Why it matters: It's now virtually inevitable that the Senate will vote to confirm President Trump's third Supreme Court nominee before the election, which is just nine days away.

Oct 24, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Texas Supreme Court stays order blocking limits on ballot drop-off sites

A sign is seen at drive-through mail ballot drop off site at NRG Stadium in Houston. Photo: Go Nakamura/Getty Images

The Texas Supreme Court on Saturday temporarily stayed an order by the lower court that blocked Gov. Greg Abbott's limits on drop-off locations for mail-in ballots.

Why it matters: The move means voters will continue to be restricted to a single drop-off location per county for now. The state's Supreme Court gave both sides until Monday at 5 p.m. CDT to file responses as it considers whether to take up the issue. By then, there will be just over one week until the election.

Oct 26, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Key takeaways from the "60 Minutes" interviews with Trump and Biden

Combination image of President Trump and Democratic Presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden during the first presidential debate in Cleveland, Ohio on Sept. 29. Photo: Jim Watson, Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

CBS' "60 Minutes" aired its interviews with President Trump and Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden Sunday evening, as the 2020 election rivals offered starkly different visions for the U.S.

The big picture: The show opened with Trump's interview with CBS' Lesley Stahl — which she noted "began politely, but ended regrettably, contentiously" after the president abruptly ended it, before moving on to Vice President Mike Pence, and then Biden and running mate Sen. Kamala Harris.