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Nancy Pelosi during a news conference on Capitol Hill last Thursday. Photo: Caroline Brehman/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) told reporters Monday that a second economic relief package to combat the coronavirus outbreak could be introduced as soon as this week.

The big picture: The package, outlined by Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) Sunday, is an alternative plan to President Trump's economic proposal that would include a payroll tax cut and relief for hourly workers, which the top Democrats criticized for focusing on the stock market, rather than the outbreak.

  • Pelosi said the plan "may be ready" to vote on this week. How quickly the Democrats could get their plan ready would depend on the Congressional Budget Office, the legislative counsel and how quickly they could get costing to them. The Democrats "can introduce [it] this week," she said.
  • If it's not ready, she plans to wait until after recess as she's been given no reason to return early "from our CAO, from our Sergeant at Arms, our Attending Physician or any of that." She said they could condense recess "if there's a necessity — if we think we’re going to get some action in the Senate to do it."

Zoom in: The Democrats are seeking measures that include paid sick leave for those impacted by COVID-19, widespread and free coronavirus testing access, the expansion of programs such as SNAP food stamps, and reimbursement to patients for noncovered costs related to the virus.

The other side: Trump said in a tweet early Monday, "The Fake News Media and their partner, the Democrat Party, is doing everything within its semi-considerable power (it used to be greater!) to inflame the CoronaVirus situation, far beyond what the facts would warrant. Surgeon General, 'The risk is low to the average American.'"

Go deeper: Surgeon general: U.S. is moving to "mitigation phase" of coronavirus response

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Pfizer CEO feels "liberated" after taking COVID vaccine

Pfizer CEO Albert Bourla. Photo: "Axios on HBO"

Pfizer CEO Albert Bourla tells "Axios on HBO" that he recently received his first of two doses of the company's coronavirus vaccine.

Why it matters: Bourla told CNBC in December that company polling found that one of the most effective ways to increase confidence in the vaccine was to have the CEO take it.

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Ripple CEO: SEC lawsuit is "bad for crypto" in the U.S.

Ripple CEO Brad Garlinghouse tells "Axios on HBO" that if his company loses a lawsuit brought by U.S. regulators, it would put the country at a competitive disadvantage when it comes to cryptocurrencies.

Between the lines: The SEC in December sued Ripple, and Garlinghouse personally, for allegedly selling over $1.3 billion in unregistered securities. Ripple's response is that its cryptocurrency, called XRP, didn't require registration because it's an asset rather than a security.

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Pfizer CEO: "It will be terrible" if COVID-19 vaccine prices limit access

Pfizer CEO Albert Bourla told "Axios on HBO" that it "will be terrible for society" if the price of coronavirus vaccines ever prohibits some people from taking them.

Why it matters: Widespread uptake of the vaccine — which might require annual booster shots — will reduce the risk of the virus continuing to spread and mutate, but it's unclear who will pay for future shots or how much they'll cost.