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Photo: Toby Melville/WPA Pool/Getty Images

Scotland's Court of Session, its highest civil court, ruled Wednesday that the ongoing suspension — or "prorogation" — of the U.K. Parliament by Prime Minister Boris Johnson's government is unlawful, per the BBC.

What's next: The court's ruling did not include an order to cancel the prorogation, so Parliament will remain out of session. The case now heads to the U.K.'s Supreme Court next week.

Why it matters: It puts Queen Elizabeth II in an awkward place as she approved the order to suspend Parliament based on advice from Johnson's administration.

  • Dr. Catherine Haddon, a senior fellow at the Institute for Government, tweets that "for a court to rule that advice was unlawful, even if the ruling is later rejected, opens up [questions] about how that advice is given. She has to be able to trust [10 Downing Street]."

What they're saying ... 10 Downing Street issued a statement in response to the ruling:

"We are disappointed by today’s decision, and will appeal to the U.K. Supreme Court. The U.K. Government needs to bring forward a strong domestic legislative agenda. Proroguing Parliament is the legal and necessary way of delivering this."

The state of play, per Axios' Zach Basu: Johnson's controversial move to suspend Parliament until Oct. 14 was originally designed to thwart rebel attempts to block a no-deal Brexit, but it may end up weakening his own bargaining position.

  • Rebels got the no-deal legislation, which requires him to extend Brexit beyond Oct. 31 by Oct. 19 if no deal is in place, passed anyway. Johnson also failed in his two attempts to call a snap election, leaving him only a few days to figure out a solution once Parliament returns.
  • It's unclear what comes next. A wild showdown in October could see Johnson refuse to abide by the opposition's law — with consequences as severe as jail — or choose to resign rather than break his promise to deliver Brexit on Halloween, "do or die."

Go deeper: The wild scenes on Parliament's last day before prorogation

Go deeper

Updated 21 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Inauguration Day dashboard

U.S. Capitol and stage are lit at sunrise ahead of the inauguration of Joe Biden. Photo: Patrick Semansky - Pool/Getty Images

President Biden has delivered his inaugural address at the Capitol, calling for an end to the politics as total war but warning that "we have far to go" to heal the country.

What's next: Biden has arrived at the White House and he will sign executive orders and other presidential actions.

49 mins ago - Podcasts

Podcast: After the Biden inaugural

Joe Biden was sworn in today as America's 46th president in an inauguration unlike any other in modern history.

Axios Re:Cap goes deeper into the speech, the atmosphere and what it all tells us about the incoming administration, with Axios political reporters Hans Nichols and Alexi McCammond.

Biden embarks on a consequential presidency

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Donald Trump tried everything to delegitimize the rival who vanquished him. In reality, he's set Joe Biden on course to be a far more consequential U.S. president than he might otherwise have become.

The big picture: President Biden now confronts not just a pandemic, but massive political divisions and an assault on truth — and the aftermath of the assault on the Capitol two weeks ago that threatened democracy itself.