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Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

K-12 schools weighing a shift to online learning in the shadow of the coronavirus are grappling with what to do about kids who don't have internet at home.

Why it matters: The "digital divide" between internet access haves and have-nots has long been an abstract public-policy debating point, but this public health crisis is bringing the issue home in a concrete way.

Driving the news: Schools in Washington state this week said they are preparing to offer online classes. Eleven deaths in the state have been linked to COVID-19.

  • Eastside Preparatory School, a private school system in Kirkland, said it is implementing its distance learning program for three weeks, beginning March 9.
  • Eastside Prep will buy and deliver devices to any student that needs them to participate. "The threat was genuine, and we felt that we had an ethical responsibility to take steps to stop the transmission of the virus," Head of School Terry Macaluso said in an emailed statement.
  • Northshore School District, which has more than 23,000 students in the Seattle suburbs, will transition to online learning March 9. Superintendent Michelle Reid told Axios about 2,600 families have taken the district up on its offer to loan computing devices, while fewer have sought district-provided internet hot spots.
  • "We understand not all districts are able to go to fully online learning and may not have the resources to do so," Reid said. "There is an inequity across our educational system."

Yes, but: Although individual schools and districts are hashing out plans to support online classes for students who don't have in-home broadband, it's a huge challenge to do so on a broader scale.

  • "I don’t think the schools are adequately prepared to provide online learning to all of their students at home if they have to close for a long period of time," said John Windhausen, executive director of the Schools, Health & Libraries Broadband Coalition. "It could be better than having no school whatsoever, but there are an awful lot of questions about how to do so fairly."

By the numbers: Estimates on the number of U.S. households with school-age children who lack home internet access range from 6 million to 7 million, according to government data.

Where it stands: The Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction, the state education agency, said in guidance to public schools that it will likely make more sense to cancel school and make up missed days than to "deploy a distance learning model that can be accessed by some, but not all, of your students."

  • Rhett Nelson, director of the Alternative Learning Department at OSPI, said he's heard from three districts in the state that are exploring online classes.
  • "The big one is the equity consideration — if you're doing this, who won't be able to access public school in that situation? It's likely going to be those students who are already at risk," Nelson said, noting that beyond technology challenges, districts should consider whether students' home lives are stable enough for online learning.

What to watch: Federal Communications Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel, who has pushed to do more to close the "homework gap" faced by schoolchildren who lack home internet access, pointed to legislative efforts from Sen. Chris Van Hollen (D-Md.) and Rep. Grace Meng (D-NY) that could help by allocating money to increasing broadband access for school kids.

  • "Those types of solutions could be tremendously valuable right now to the millions of families trying to figure out how their child can get online and get their homework done if their school closes," Rosenworcel said in a statement.
  • Senate Commerce Committee ranking member Maria Cantwell (D-Wash.) urged FCC Chairman Ajit Pai to consider temporary measures the agency could deploy to support in-home connectivity for students if remote schoolwork becomes necessary.

Meanwhile, start-up Outschool, which provides a marketplace of online classes, has offered free training to schools trying to shift to online learning. At least 30 schools, including many in the Bay Area, have sought the assistance in the past week, CEO Amir Nathoo said.

Go deeper

Scoop: Gina Haspel threatened to resign over plan to install Kash Patel as CIA deputy

CIA Director Gina Haspel. Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

CIA Director Gina Haspel threatened to resign in early December after President Trump cooked up a hasty plan to install loyalist Kash Patel, a former aide to Rep. Devin Nunes (R-Calif.), as her deputy, according to three senior administration officials with direct knowledge of the matter.

Why it matters: The revelation stunned national security officials and almost blew up the leadership of the world's most powerful spy agency. Only a series of coincidences — and last minute interventions from Vice President Mike Pence and White House counsel Pat Cipollone — stopped it.

Updated 5 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: Coronavirus deaths reach 4,000 per day as hospitals remain in crisis mode — CDC warns highly transmissible coronavirus variant could become dominant in U.S. in March.
  2. Politics: Biden says, "We will manage the hell out of" vaccine distribution — Biden taps ex-FDA chief to lead Operation Warp Speed amid rollout of COVID plan — Widow of GOP congressman-elect who died of COVID-19 will run to fill his seat.
  3. Vaccine: Battling Black mistrust of the vaccines"Pharmacy deserts" could become vaccine deserts — Instacart to give $25 to shoppers who get vaccine.
  4. Economy: Unemployment filings explode againFed chair: No interest rate hike coming any time soon —  Inflation rose more than expected in December.
  5. World: WHO team arrives in China to investigate pandemic origins.

John Weaver, Lincoln Project co-founder, acknowledges “inappropriate” messages

John Weaver aboard John McCain's campaign plane in February 2000. Photo: Robert Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images)

John Weaver, a veteran Republican operative who co-founded the Lincoln Project, declared in a statement to Axios on Friday that he sent “inappropriate,” sexually charged messages to multiple men.

  • “To the men I made uncomfortable through my messages that I viewed as consensual mutual conversations at the time: I am truly sorry. They were inappropriate and it was because of my failings that this discomfort was brought on you,” Weaver said.
  • “The truth is that I'm gay,” he added. “And that I have a wife and two kids who I love. My inability to reconcile those two truths has led to this agonizing place.”