North Koreans watching a missile test on July 31. Photo: Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images

North Korea has fired 2 "unidentified projectiles" into the East Sea for the 4th time in less than 2 weeks, according to the South Korean military.

The big picture: President Trump said last week that the short-range missile tests North Korea has been conducting do not violate the terms of his agreement with Kim Jong-un in Singapore last year, but he nonetheless urged Kim to "do the right thing." A spokesperson for North Korea's foreign ministry on Monday protested joint military drills by the U.S. and South Korea, warning that the country is still committed to dialogue but could be forced to take a “new road,” per North Korean state media.

Full statement:

Despite our repeated warnings, the United States and South Korean authorities have finally started the joint military exercise targeting the DPRK. This is an undisguised denial and flagrant violation of June 12 DPRK-U.S. Joint Statement, Panmunjom Declaration & Sept. Pyongyang Joint Declaration, all of which are agreements to establish new DPRK-U.S. relations and build a lasting, stable peace regime on the Korean peninsula. The U.S. and South Korean authorities do not have political will at all to implement the joint statements whereby they committed to improve DPRK-U.S. relations and the inter-Korean relations, and that they remain unchanged in their position to continue to face us as an enemy.

Go deeper: Ignoring North Korean missile tests could hamper nuclear talks

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Updated 10 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Supreme Court denies Pennsylvania GOP request to limit mail-in voting

Protesters outside Supreme Court. Photo: Daniel Slim/AFP via Getty Images

The Supreme Court on Monday denied a request from Pennsylvania's Republican Party to shorten the deadlines for mail-in ballots in the state. Thanks to the court's 4-4 deadlock, ballots can be counted for several days after Election Day.

Why it matters: It's a major win for Democrats that could decide the fate of thousands of ballots in a crucial swing state that President Trump won in 2016. The court's decision may signal how it would deal with similar election-related litigation in other states.

Microphones will be muted during parts of Thursday's presidential debate

Photos: Jim Watson and Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

The Commission on Presidential Debates adopted new rules on Monday to mute microphones to allow President Trump and Joe Biden two minutes of uninterrupted time per segment during Thursday night's debate, AP reports.

Why it matters: In the September debate, Trump interrupted Biden 71 times, compared with Biden's 22 interruptions of Trump.

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

  1. Politics: Trump says if Biden's elected, "he'll listen to the scientists"Trump calls Fauci a "disaster" on campaign call.
  2. Health: Coronavirus hospitalizations are on the rise — 8 states set single-day coronavirus case records last week.
  3. States: Wisconsin judge reimposes capacity limit on indoor venues.
  4. Media: Trump attacks CNN as "dumb b*stards" for continuing to cover pandemic.
  5. Business: Consumer confidence surveys show Americans are getting nervousHow China's economy bounced back from coronavirus.
  6. Sports: We've entered the era of limited fan attendance.
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