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Sure, the market for Democratic presidential candidates is getting a little saturated. So why are some Democrats still thinking of jumping in? Because there's almost never a downside to running.

Expand chart
Data: Axios research; Chart: Harry Stevens and Aïda Amer/Axios

The big picture: It doesn't have to be someone who might actually get close to the White House, like Joe Biden. The candidates of the crowded fields in the last few presidential elections — even the also-rans — almost always came out ahead or, at worst, ended up in the same place.

  • Unless they have skeletons in their closets that could be exposed, there's really no reason for yet another long-shot candidate not to give it a chance.

No Democrat will say they're running for something else, like vice president or Cabinet secretary. But that's where some of them will end up, if the Democratic nominee beats President Trump.

  • If Trump wins, some of them are young enough to give it another try in four years. And if that doesn't happen, they can always become a cable news talking head.

A quick look at the "whatever happened to them" file:

  • Hillary Clinton (2008) became Barack Obama's secretary of state before moving on to that other presidential race.
  • Joe Biden (2008) became Obama's vice president.
  • Mitt Romney (2008) became the Republican nominee four years later — and is now a senator from Utah.
  • Rick Perry (2012, 2016) is Trump's energy secretary.
  • Ben Carson (2016) is Trump's HUD secretary.
  • John Kasich (2016) finished out his term as Ohio governor, became a CNN commentator and hasn't ruled out running against Trump again.
  • Bernie Sanders (2016) is running again.
  • Ted Cruz, Marco Rubio, Lindsey Graham and Rand Paul (2016) all went back to the Senate.
  • Even Howard Dean (2004) survived "the scream" and became chairman of the Democratic National Committee.

There can be a couple of downsides, but they're rare. One is that you're taken less seriously if you don't do well and disappear (Herman Cain/Michele Bachmann, 2012) — or you're never taken seriously in the first place (Mike Gravel, 2008).

The bottom line: Go ahead, Michael Bennet, Terry McAuliffe, Seth Moulton and Eric Swalwell. Knock yourselves out. And really, Stacey Abrams — why settle for VP?

Go deeper: Track which candidates are running

Go deeper

Prosecutors begin closing arguments in Chauvin trial

Steve Schleicher, an attorney for the prosecution in Derek Chauvin's trial, began closing arguments on Monday by describing in detail George Floyd's last moments — crying out for help and surrounded by strangers, as Chauvin pressed his knee into Floyd for nine minutes and 29 seconds.

Why it matters: The jury's verdict in Chauvin's murder trial, seen by advocates as one of the most crucial civil rights cases in decades, will reverberate across the country and have major implications in the fight for racial justice.

Kendall Baker, author of Sports
3 hours ago - Sports

European soccer is at war

Liverpool celebrating its 2019 Champions League victory. Photo: Nigel Roddis/Getty Images

Europe's biggest soccer clubs have established The Super League, a new midweek tournament that would compete with — and threaten the very existence of — the Champions League.

Why it matters: This new league, set to start in 2023, "would bring about the most significant restructuring of elite European soccer since the 1950s, and could herald the largest transfer of wealth to a small set of teams in modern sports history," writes NYT's Tariq Panja.

Dion Rabouin, author of Markets
4 hours ago - Economy & Business

2021's expected earnings blowout begins

JPMorgan CEO Jamie Dimon. Photo: Mark Kauzlarich/Bloomberg via Getty Images

First-quarter earnings so far have been very strong, outpacing even the rosy expectations from Wall Street and that's a trend that's expected to continue for all of 2021. S&P 500 companies are on pace for one of the best quarters of positive earnings surprises on record, according to FactSet.

Why it matters: The results show that not only has the earnings recession ended for U.S. companies, but firms are performing better than expected and the economy may be justifying all the hype.