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The Secret Service warns that an organized scam ring from Nigeria has been using stolen personal information to apply for unemployment benefits in various states, Krebs on Security reported over the weekend.

Why it matters: States were already struggling with a deluge of claims and trying to speed up the process. Defending against scammers could prompt governments to instill stricter security measures, potentially delaying payment to the millions who have recently lost their jobs.

What's happening: The Secret Service memo was circulated last week, per Krebs, and warns that the scammers appear to have a large database of personal information they are using to apply for benefits.

  • Washington State has been the biggest target, with claims also apparently submitted in North Carolina, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Oklahoma, Wyoming and Florida.
  • The scheme is similar to another, already prevalent attack, in which scammers use stolen Social Security numbers to file fraudulent federal income tax returns and collect other people's refunds.

Go deeper: Another 3 million Americans filed for unemployment last week

Go deeper

Updated Aug 11, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Trump whisked out of press briefing after shooting outside White House

President Trump was escorted out of a coronavirus press briefing by a Secret Service agent on Monday evening after law enforcement reportedly shot an armed suspect outside of the White House.

What's new: The 51-year-old suspect approached a uniformed Secret Service officer on the corner of 17th Street and Pennsylvania Avenue NW, near the White House, and said he had a weapon, the agency alleged in a statement late Monday. He "ran aggressively towards the officer, and in a drawing motion, withdrew the object from his clothing."

26 mins ago - Politics & Policy

McConnell drops filibuster demand, paving way for power-sharing deal

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (R) and Minority Leader Mitch McConnell attend a joint session of Congress. Photo: Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell has abandoned his demand that Democrats state, in writing, that they would not abandon the legislative filibuster.

Between the lines: McConnell was never going to agree to a 50-50 power sharing deal without putting up a fight over keeping the 60-vote threshold. But the minority leader ultimately caved after it became clear that delaying the organizing resolution was no longer feasible.

2 hours ago - Technology

Scoop: Google won't donate to members of Congress who voted against election results

Sen. Ted Cruz led the group of Republicans who opposed certifying the results. Photo: Stefani Reynolds/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Google will not make contributions from its political action committee this cycle to any member of Congress who voted against certifying the results of the presidential election, following the deadly Capitol riot.

Why it matters: Several major businesses paused or pulled political donations following the events of Jan. 6, when pro-Trump rioters, riled up by former President Trump, stormed the Capitol on the day it was to certify the election results.