Colin Kaepernick warms up before an NFL game. Photo: John Hefti/Icon Sportswire/Corbis via Getty Images

The NFL has issued a statement supporting Nike's decision to make former San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick a face of Nike's "Just Do It" ad campaign, saying they "embrace the role and responsibility of everyone involved with this game."

"The National Football League believes in dialogue, understanding and unity. We embrace the role and responsibility of everyone involved with this game to promote meaningful, positive change in our communities... The social justice issues that Colin and other professional athletes have raised deserve our attention and action."
— Jocelyn Moore, NFL's executive vice president of communications and public affairs

The big picture: Nike's announcement was met with mixed emotions. Shares of Nike fell more than 2% in early trading after the company revealed Kaepernick, one of the first NFL athletes to kneel during the national anthem, as one of the faces of its 30th anniversary ad campaign.

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Right-wing media defanged by dissolving anti-Biden storylines

Data: NewsWhip; Chart: Naema Ahmed/Axios

The three biggest anti-Joe Biden storylines in right-wing media over the last year have either fizzled or are getting less online traction than they used to, according to data from NewsWhip provided exclusively to Axios.

Why it matters: This dynamic has rendered a formidable media ecosystem less effective in boosting President Trump as we move into the heart of the 2020 campaign.

A coronavirus alarm bell is going off in the Midwest

Data: The COVID Tracking Project; Note: Positive rate shown is the 7-day average from June 1 to Aug. 6, 2020; Cartogram: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

A cluster of states in the Midwest are seeing more of their coronavirus tests coming back positive — potentially an early indicator of a growing outbreak.

The state of play: A high positive rate means that a higher share of those getting tested are sick. That could be because there are more sick people, or because a state isn't doing enough testing.

Biden clarifies comments on African American and Latino communities

Joe Biden delivering a speech in Delaware in July. Photo: Mark Makela/Getty Images

Joe Biden explained on Twitter Thursday night what he "meant" by earlier comments suggesting that "the African American community is a monolith."

What they're saying: "Unlike the African-American community, with notable exceptions, the Latino community is an incredibly diverse community with incredibly different attitudes about different things," Biden remarked in an interview hosted by the National Association of Hispanic Journalists and the National Association for Black Journalists, Politico reports.