Sep 24, 2017

The NFL's day of protest

Dave Lawler, author of World

New England Patriots players kneel during the national anthem. Photo: Michael Dwyer / AP

Beginning with the early game in London where several players from both the Ravens and Jaguars knelt during the national anthem, and heading into the first full slate of games when the Steelers declined to take the field for the anthem and teams across the league locked arms in solidarity, the NFL is showing collective resistance today to President Trump's comments about players who protest during the anthem.

Before the games, Trump tweeted that those who refuse to stand should be fired or suspended. After the much-expanded protests, Trump followed up: "Great solidarity for our National Anthem and for our Country. Standing with locked arms is good, kneeling is not acceptable. Bad ratings!" He later told reporters the situation had "nothing to do with race."

Go deeper: The Great Divider, What Trump/NFL are thinking, the conversation, Trump on NFL/race.

  • One more Trump tweet: "Courageous Patriots have fought and died for our great American Flag --- we MUST honor and respect it! MAKE AMERICA GREAT AGAIN!"
  • The Pittsburgh Steelers didn't take the field for the anthem. Coach Mike Tomlin said he didn't want the players to have to choose whether to protest or not. Tackle Alejandro Villanueva, a former Army ranger, stood alone and sang along.
  • Patriots owner Robert Kraft, a friend and donor of Trump's, said he was "deeply disappointed" by the president's remarks.
  • Shahid Khan, the Jaguars owner who gave $1 million to Trump's inaugural committee, linked arms with his players in a show of solidarity.
  • Rex Ryan, the former Bills coach who once introduced Trump at a rally, said he was "pissed off" by Trump's descriptions of protesting players.

Go deeper

Updated 31 mins ago - Technology

Twitter: Trump's Minnesota tweet violated rules on violence

Twitter said Friday morning that a tweet from President Trump in which he threatened shooting in response to civil unrest in Minneapolis violated the company's rules. The company said it was leaving the tweet up in the public interest.

Why it matters: The move exacerbates tensions between Twitter and Trump over the company's authority to label or limit his speech and, conversely, the president's authority to dictate rules for a private company.

Updated 45 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Trump threatens to "assume control" of Minneapolis over unrest

Flames from a nearby fire illuminate protesters standing on a barricade in front of the Third Police Precinct in Minneapolis on Thursday. Photo: Kerem Yucel/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump threatened via Twitter early Friday to send the national guard to Minneapolis following three days of massive demonstrations and unrest in the city over George Floyd, a black man who died in police custody this week.

Details: "I can’t stand back & watch this happen to a great American City, Minneapolis. A total lack of leadership. Either the very weak Radical Left Mayor, Jacob Frey, get his act together and bring the City under control, or I will send in the National Guard & get the job done right," Trump tweeted after a police station was torched by some protesters.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

In photos: Protests over George Floyd's death grip Minneapolis

Protesters cheer as the Third Police Precinct burns behind them on in Minneapolis on Thursday night. Photo: Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

Cheering protesters set a Minneapolis police station on fire Thursday night in the third night of unrest following the death of George Floyd, a black man who died in police custody in the city, per AP.

The state of play: Minnesota's governor on Thursday activated the state's national guard following violent outbreaks throughout the week, as the nation waits to see if the officers involved will be charged with murder.