Aug 6, 2019

Most interns in top newsrooms come from very selective universities

A new study from Voices, a student program run by the Asian American Journalists Association, finds that 2 out of 3 summer interns from 7 top newsrooms came from among the most selective colleges in America.

By the numbers: "65% of summer interns from a group of publications including The New York Times, the Washington Post, the Wall Street Journal, NPR and Los Angeles Times, came from among very selective universities in the nation," the group writes in a blog post.

  • "The idea that the way you’re supposed to go into journalism — through a high-end journalism school — is 'basically creating a caste system for young reporters,' Gustavo Arellano, a features writer at the Los Angeles Times and former editor of the OC Weekly, said."

What's next: The Knight Foundation said yesterday that it's giving $1.2 million in new funding for the Robert C. Maynard Institute for Journalism Education to create a program for news organizations "to help them better inform underserved communities and establish more equitable and inclusive workplaces."

Go deeper: Students in poverty fuel for-profit universities

Editor’s note: This post has been clarified to specify the group within the AAJA that conducted the study.

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Scoop: Trump allies raise money to target reporters

Photo: Tom Brenner/Getty Images

President Trump's political allies are trying to raise at least $2 million to investigate reporters and editors of the New York Times, Washington Post and other outlets, according to a 3-page fundraising pitch reviewed by Axios. 

Why it matters: Trump’s war on the media is expanding. This group will target reporters and editors, while other GOP 2020 entities go after the social media platforms, alleging bias, officials tell us.

Go deeperArrowSep 3, 2019

The media struggle to talk about race, too

Illustration: Rebecca Zisser/Axios

The role of race in the recent hate-fueled violence — along with President Trump's increasingly brazen embrace of racist stereotypes and language — has highlighted the news media's struggles in talking about race, hate and other painful issues of divisiveness.

The big picture: News organizations are expected to stick to the facts and avoid taking sides, but they're under growing pressure not to mislabel statements and actions that most Americans would consider racist. And the lack of diversity in newsrooms means many have blind spots on issues of race that become obvious in their coverage.

Go deeperArrowAug 10, 2019

NYT: Pro-Trump operatives compiling "fireable" dirt on hundreds of journalists

Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

A pro-Trump network of conservative operatives has been compiling dossiers of potentially damaging public comments and social media posts by journalists who have produced unfavorable coverage of the administration, the New York Times' Ken Vogel and Jeremy Peters report.

The big picture: The group has already released information on journalists at CNN, the Times and the Washington Post, but sources say the operation has only disclosed a fraction of its dirt. More is set to be disseminated as the 2020 election campaign ramps up, including potentially "fireable" information on "several hundred" journalists, according to one source. The research is also said to include information on journalists' families and any "toxic" political affiliations.

Go deeperArrowAug 25, 2019