Searching for smart, safe news you can TRUST?

Support safe, smart, REAL journalism. Sign up for our Axios AM & PM newsletters and get smarter, faster.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa Bay news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Charlotte news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

For-profit colleges and universities have a higher share of students in poverty than any other kind of post-secondary institution, according to a new study by Pew Research Center.

Expand chart
Data: Pew Research; Chart: Axios Visuals

Why it matters: For-profit universities can provide higher education for students who would otherwise not be able to pursue a college degree. The downside is that for-profit degrees are, on average, much more expensive than degrees from not-for-profit institutions. And studies have found that for-profit students are less likely to graduate and more likely to struggle to pay off large amounts of student debt, as Axios has reported.

The big picture: The for-profit higher education industry has been struggling with financial troubles and accusations of false advertising and predatory lending. More than 1,000 for-profit college campuses closed in the past five years, displacing around 450,000 students, according to the Chronicle of Higher Education.

By the numbers:

  • For-profit colleges represent only about one-tenth of U.S. college enrollment, per the Chronicle of Higher Education
  • Half of independent students at for-profit universities are living in poverty — 7 percentage points higher than at public 4-year universities, according to Pew.
  • Two-thirds of students still financially dependent on their parents and studying at for-profit universities live in poverty, compared to less than 20% of dependent students at public universities.
  • Between 1996 and 2016, growth in poor, dependent college students was highest among for-profit institutions and public 2-year colleges.
  • While all colleges and universities saw their poor, independent student populations rise over the 20 year span, for-profit universities had the slowest growth.

The bottom line: For-profit universities can help impoverished and marginalized students by giving them a chance at earning a degree. But the cost and instability of for-profit colleges can also contribute to socio-economic inequality.

Go deeper

A new Washington

Photo: Stefani Reynolds/Getty Image

D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser said Friday that the city should expect a "new normal" for security — even after President-elect Biden's inauguration.

The state of play: Inaugurations are usually a point of celebration in D.C., but over 20,000 troops are now patrolling Washington streets in an unprecedented preparation for Biden's swearing-in on Jan. 20.

Mike Pence calls Kamala Harris to offer congratulations and help

Mike Pence. Photo: Chip Somodevilla via Getty

Vice President Mike Pence called Vice President-elect Kamala Harris on Thursday to congratulate her and offer assistance in the transition, the New York Times first reported.

Why it matters: The belated conversation came six days before the inauguration after a contentious post-election stretch. President Trump has neither spoken with President-elect Joe Biden, nor explicitly conceded the 2020 election.

Updated 2 hours ago - Health

The coronavirus variants: What you need to know

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

New variants of the coronavirus circulating globally appear to increase transmission and are being closely monitored by scientists.

Driving the news: The highly contagious variant B.1.1.7 originally detected in the U.K. could become the dominant strain in the U.S. by March if no measures are taken to control the spread of the virus, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Friday.

You’ve caught up. Now what?

Sign up for Mike Allen’s daily Axios AM and PM newsletters to get smarter, faster on the news that matters.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!