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Data: NewsWhip; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

The New York Times' bombshell tax investigation has become one of the most viral investigative news stories on social media during the Trump era, according to data from NewsWhip.

Why it matters: The years-long anticipation of the release of President Trump's tax returns has hit a nerve among Americans, many of whom have been waiting to see whether the returns reinforce rumors of the president's flimsy financial record.

Driving the news: Social media interactions (likes, comments, shares) from within the first 24 hours of Sunday's tax returns article dwarfs the total for the other investigative pieces listed.

  • Only the Times' previous piece about Trump's tax information eclipsed 1 million interactions.
  • Social media interactions on news articles overall have spiked in 2020, according to NewsWhip.

Yes, but: Other story genres — particularly breaking news — routinely perform better on social media than investigations, which are often difficult to distill in a headline. The biggest article overall was news of Ruth Bader Ginsburg's death from NPR with 10.7 million interactions.

Bottom line: There have been so many groundbreaking investigations over the past few years that it's hard for any one storyline to stick, but the data from NewsWhip shows that no others have had the internet firepower as the tax bombshell.

What's next: The Times' investigation — which Trump has called "fake news" — comes ahead of the first debate between the president and Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden on Tuesday.

Go deeper: Key findings from NYT report on Trump's taxes

Go deeper

Tech's biggest upcoming battles in 2020

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

The most consequential stories for tech in 2020 pit the industry's corporate colossi against the U.S. government, foreign nations, and the human needs of their own customers.

Why it matters: Today's tech giants own and operate the informational hubs that increasingly shape our public and private lives. That's putting their products and policies under greater scrutiny than ever before.

McConnell drops filibuster demand, paving way for power-sharing deal

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (R) and Minority Leader Mitch McConnell attend a joint session of Congress. Photo: Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell has abandoned his demand that Democrats state, in writing, that they would not abandon the legislative filibuster.

Between the lines: McConnell was never going to agree to a 50-50 power sharing deal without putting up a fight over keeping the 60-vote threshold. But the minority leader ultimately caved after it became clear that delaying the organizing resolution was no longer feasible.

Scoop: Google won't donate to members of Congress who voted against election results

Sen. Ted Cruz led the group of Republicans who opposed certifying the results. Photo: Stefani Reynolds/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Google will not make contributions from its political action committee this cycle to any member of Congress who voted against certifying the results of the presidential election, following the deadly Capitol riot.

Why it matters: Several major businesses paused or pulled political donations following the events of Jan. 6, when pro-Trump rioters, riled up by former President Trump, stormed the Capitol on the day it was to certify the election results.