Early voting for the Nevada Democratic presidential caucus on Feb. 18 in Las Vegas. Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images

Election volunteers in charge of tallying results in Saturday's Democratic caucus are being asked to sign legal agreements to keep them from hurting the reputation of the Nevada Democratic Party, the Washington Post reports.

Why it matters: These nondisparagement agreements come after Democrats used an app created by Shadow Inc. that threw Iowa's caucuses into disarray, leading to delayed results amid evidence of an error-riddled process.

The impact: At least three caucus volunteers interviewed by the Post have quit in protest of the agreements.

What they're saying: Seth Morrison, a former volunteer caucus site leader, told the Post that he could not sign the agreement given to him by the party because it was "so broad, I could be sued for anything I say about the Democratic Party of Nevada while I'm serving as a volunteer" — which would bind him for life, he said.

  • Molly Forgey, a spokesperson for the Nevada Democrats, said the NDAs are voluntary and it is “standard practice to request staff and volunteers to sign an NDA because they are privy to strategic information.” Forgey did not comment as to why the agreements include a nondisparagement clause.

What to watch: Nevada's Democratic Party is currently distributing iPads with software from Cisco Systems for Saturday's caucus, the Post reports, and volunteers will use Google Forms to calculate how many delegates are awarded to each candidate.

Go deeper: Finger pointing continues over Iowa app fiasco

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Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

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Court orders temporary shutdown of Dakota Access Pipeline

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A federal judge ordered Monday the shutdown of the Dakota Access Pipeline — a project at the heart of battles over oil-and-gas infrastructure — while the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers conducts a new environmental analysis.

Why it matters: The latest twist in the years-long fight over the pipeline is a defeat for the White House agenda of advancing fossil fuel projects and a win for Native Americans and environmentalists who oppose the project

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The shortest version is that New York Times reporter Taylor Lorenz tweeted out some screenshots from the public Instagram of Away CEO Steph Korey, in which she criticized media coverage of her company.