Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Under mounting pressure from California and other state legislatures, the NCAA's Board of Governors voted Tuesday to consider letting college athletes profit from their name, image and likeness.

The state of play: While this potentially clears the way for athletes to begin accepting endorsement deals — a monumental shift that would dramatically alter the economics of college sports — the official statement offered no details, and any specific rule changes will require further discussion.

  • While the organization's stance has certainly softened, exactly what it'll be giving up is unclear.

Put more bluntly, "the NCAA's latest move is all wind and stall. It's nothing more than an attempt to slow the landslide," writes the Washington Post's Sally Jenkins.

  • "Look closely at the [statement] and note that it contains zero specifics, an almost infinite number of potential restrictions, and doesn't actually say anything about money."

The big picture: One of the main arguments against directly compensating college athletes is how complicated it would be. Do all athletes get paid or just some of them? How is that determined?

  • The name, image and likeness angle removes some of that complexity by essentially letting the market decide. Instead of paying players, it simply affords them the opportunity to make money on their own.
  • That's not to say things won't end up getting just as convoluted, though. After all, the NCAA must eventually develop a coherent set of rules that apply to a Heisman Trophy finalist just as they do to a Dartmouth swimmer.

The bottom line: The return of the "NCAA Football" video game seems like the surest thing at the moment. As for how the rest of this will work, yesterday's news doesn't change anything. Not yet.

Go deeper: California forces the NCAA's hand

Go deeper

Zeta, now a Category 2 Hurricane, makes landfall on Louisiana coast

The probable path of Zeta, per the National Hurricane Center. Photo: NHC/NOAA

Zeta, classified as a "significant" Category 2 hurricane, made landfall along the southeastern coast of Louisiana on Wednesday evening, according to the National Hurricane Center.

The state of play: Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards (D) requested a pre-landfall Emergency Declaration in a letter to President Trump on Tuesday. The hurricane is producing 110-mph maximum sustained winds and stronger gusts. The core of Zeta — including its destructive eyewall — moved ashore near Cocodrie.

Supreme Court won't expedite Pennsylvania GOP's request to block mail-in ballot extension

Amy Coney Barrett being sworn in by Chief Justice John Roberts. Photo: Fred Schilling/Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States via Getty Images

The Supreme Court voted 5-3 on Wednesday to deny a bid from Pennsylvania Republicans to expedite their request to shorten the deadline for receiving mail-in ballots. Newly-confirmed Justice Amy Coney Barrett did not participate in the decision.

Why it matters: A lower court ruling allowing ballots to be counted until 5 p.m. on Nov. 6, as long as they are postmarked by Election Day, will remain in place for now.

30 mins ago - World

Europe faces "stronger and deadlier" coronavirus wave

Paris under curfew. Photo: Kiran Ridley/Getty Images

The coronavirus is still winning: Now even Germany is entering another national lockdown, joined by France.

Why it matters: France has been "overpowered by a second wave,” President Emmanuel Macron said in a nationally televised address today. Macron said the "new wave will be stronger and deadlier" than the first.