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Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The dam has officially cracked on college athletes benefiting from their own likenesses — now the question is how much ground the NCAA is actually willing to give.

Why it matters: California's landmark law, plus the threat of other states passing their own, has succeeded in forcing the NCAA to back away from its nuclear threats around player benefits.

  • The group's board of governors voted Tuesday to consider letting players benefit from their own names, images and likenesses.
  • What they're saying: Board chair Michael V. Drake said in a statement, "We must embrace change to provide the best possible experience for college athletes."

Between the lines: Exactly what the NCAA will be giving up is far from clear, as Bloomberg notes.

  • The "NCAA stopped short of saying athletes would actually get paid."
  • "[G]etting paid to play isn’t on the table."
  • “The board of governors voted to allow players to ‘benefit’ from use of their name, image and likeness,” said NCAA players association executive director Ramogi Huma. “This is not a green light to receive ‘compensation.’"

The big picture: The NCAA is surrendering, Axios Sports editor Kendall Baker writes.

  • This was always going to happen. It was just a matter of when and how messy it was going to get with various states involved.

What to watch: As details are ironed out, expect a battle over control of college athletes’ licensing rights, Kendall tells me.

  • The NFLPA and NCPA (National College Players Association) signed a partnership yesterday.
  • The deal directly undercuts the NCAA and could provide a rubric for who goes to market with the licensing rights for athletes in major sports.

Go deeper

Kendall Baker, author of Sports
Aug 12, 2020 - Sports

Big Ten, Pac-12 postpone football as ACC, SEC, Big 12 don't

Photo: James Black/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images

The slim prospects of a fall college football season have evaporated in a matter of days — but don't tell that to the ACC, SEC and Big 12, which are still trying to make their seasons happen.

The state of play: The Big Ten and Pac-12 postponed all fall sports to the spring on Tuesday. No football, cross country, volleyball, soccer or field hockey.

Dion Rabouin, author of Markets
28 mins ago - Economy & Business

Janet Yellen said all the right things to reassure the markets

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Treasury Secretary nominee and former Fed chair Janet Yellen's confirmation hearing before the Senate Finance Committee on Tuesday showed markets just what they can expect from the administration of President-elect Joe Biden: more of what they got under President Trump — at least for now.

What it means: Investors and big companies reaped the benefits of ultralow U.S. interest rates and low taxes for most of Trump's term as well as significant increases in government spending, even before the coronavirus pandemic.

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Biden to sign 15 executive actions on Day One

President-elect Joe Biden. Photo: SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images

President-elect Joe Biden is expected to sign 15 executive actions upon taking office Wednesday, immediately reversing key Trump administration policies.

Why it matters: The 15 actions — aimed at issues like climate change and immigration — mark more drastic immediate steps compared with the two day-one actions from Biden's four predecessors combined, according to incoming White House press secretary Jen Psaki.

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