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Photo: Ashley Landis-Pool/Getty Images

The NBA and its players' union agreed on Friday to resume the league's playoffs on Saturday after players refused to take the floor for a number of games this week in protest of the police shooting of Jacob Blake in Kenosha, Wis.

Why it matters: As part of the agreement, the league agreed to work with the players to work toward three initiatives focused around social justice, civic engagement and voting rights.

  1. The NBA and its players will "immediately establish a social justice coalition, with representatives from players, coaches and governors" that will focus on "increasing access to voting, promoting civic engagement, and advocating for meaningful police and criminal justice reform."
  2. When teams own their own arenas, their leaders must "continue to work with local elections officials to convert the facility into a voting location for the 2020 general election to allow for a safe in-person voting option for communities vulnerable to COVID."
  3. The league will coordinate with players and network partners to "create and include advertising spots in each NBA playoff game dedicated to promoting greater civic engagement in national and local elections and raising awareness around voter access and opportunity."

Go deeper

Kendall Baker, author of Sports
Nov 23, 2020 - Sports

England players' union wants fewer headers amid concerns about brain injury diseases

L to R: Dennis Viollet, Bobby Charlton and Johnny Giles in 1960. Photo: Hutchinson/Mirrorpix/Getty Images

The union representing soccer players in England says that heading in training sessions "must be immediately restricted."

Why it matters: This comes amid growing concerns about brain injury diseases among former professional players.

Biden's Day 1 challenges: Systemic racism

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photo: Kirsty O'Connor (PA Images)/Getty Images

Advocates are pushing President-elect Biden to tackle systemic racism with a Day 1 agenda that includes ending the detention of migrant children and expanding DACA, announcing a Justice Department investigation of rogue police departments and returning some public lands to Indigenous tribes.

Why it matters: Biden has said the fight against systemic racism will be one of the top goals of his presidency — but the expectations may be so high that he won't be able to meet them.

Caitlin Owens, author of Vitals
34 mins ago - Health

Most Americans are still vulnerable to the coronavirus

Adapted from Bajema, et al., 2020, "Estimated SARS-CoV-2 Seroprevalence in the US as of September 2020"; Cartogram: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

As of September, the vast majority of Americans did not have coronavirus antibodies, according to a new study published in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Why it matters: As the coronavirus spreads rapidly throughout most of the country, most people remain vulnerable to it.