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Photo: Sai Aung Main/AFP via Getty Images

Police in Myanmar filed a new charge against democratically elected leader Aung San Suu Kyi for violating the country's Natural Disaster Management Law, which is often used to prosecute people who have defied coronavirus restrictions, AP reports.

Why it matters: Suu Kyi, who was detained in a military coup on Feb. 1, was already facing a charge for illegally importing walkie-talkies. The new charge could allow her to be held indefinitely without a trial, after the military changed the Penal Code last week to allow law enforcement to detain people without court permission, per AP.

  • The maximum penalty for the coronavirus violation is three years in prison.
  • Former President Win Myint also faced charges under the same law for having public gatherings amid the pandemic.

The big picture: Protesters have continued to gather across the country to resist the military after it seized power, citing voter fraud in an election that Suu Kyi’s party won in a landslide.

  • A Myanmar military spokesperson said on Tuesday that Suu Kyi was "in good health," Deutsche Welle reports.
  • Suu Kyi is believed to be under house arrest in her home in Naypyitaw.

The U.S. and other countries have called for the Myanmar military to release Suu Kyi, and President Biden last week announced that he would sanction the leaders involved in the coup.

Go deeper

Feb 15, 2021 - World

Myanmar protesters rally as military deploys armored vehicles in streets

A soldier stands guard next to protesters holding signs during a demonstration against the military coup outside the Central Bank of Myanmar in Yangon on Monday. Photo: Sai Aung Main/AFP via Getty Images

Myanmar anti-coup protesters gathered for a 10th day on Monday despite fears of a crackdown after the military deployed armored vehicles in city streets overnight, per the BBC.

The big picture: Additional troops were seen in the capital Yangon as civilian leader Aung San Suu Kyi's detention was extended for two days, the Guardian notes. She and other officials from her National League for Democracy have been detained since the Feb. 1 coup.

Go deeper: Myanmar army suspends laws limiting forces

Dion Rabouin, author of Markets
35 mins ago - Economy & Business

The Fed could be firing up economic stimulus in disguise

Federal Reserve governor Lael Brainard at a "Fed Listens" event. Photo: Eric Baradat / AFP via Getty Images.

Even as global growth expectations increase and governments pile on fiscal spending measures central bankers are quietly restarting recession-era bond-buying programs.

Driving the news: Comments Tuesday from Fed governor Lael Brainard suggest the Fed may be jumping onboard the global monetary policy rethink and restarting a program used following the 2008 global financial crisis.

Democrats' hypocrisy moment

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios. Photo: Ray Tamarra/Getty Images

Gov. Andrew Cuomo should be facing explicit calls to resign from President Biden on down, if you apply the standard that Democrats set for similar allegations against Republicans. And it's not a close call.

Why it matters: The #MeToo moment saw men in power run out of town for exploiting young women. Democrats led the charge. So the silence of so many of them seems more strange — and unacceptable by their own standards — by the hour.