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Photo: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Lawyers for House lawmakers have suggested they believe President Trump may have lied to former special counsel Robert Mueller about his knowledge of his campaign's connections to WikiLeaks, according to a court filing obtained by Politico Monday.

The big picture: The filing forms part of the House Judiciary Committee's efforts to obtain Mueller's grand-jury documents, which are currently secret. The House alleges redacted parts of the Mueller report could be detailed by the documents and potentially show that Trump knew of his campaign's contacts with WikiLeaks.

A tweet previously embedded here has been deleted or was tweeted from an account that has been suspended or deleted.
  • "Not only could those materials demonstrate the president’s motives for obstructing the special counsel’s investigation, they also could reveal that Trump was aware of his campaign’s contacts with WikiLeaks," the filing reads, per Politico.

Between the lines: The filing also suggests the Mueller material could be useful to the current probe into Trump's Ukraine scandal, which has fueled the launch of a formal impeachment inquiry against the president.

  • "Those events may also be relevant to the House’s investigation of the president’s solicitation of Ukrainian interference in the 2020 election,” the filing notes. "Under the Constitution’s separation of powers, and the authority the Constitution vests in the House alone to structure its proceedings, that power is not DOJ’s for the taking."

What they're saying: Trump’s personal attorney Jay Sekulow told Politico any allegation that Trump lied to Mueller’s investigators was "absurd."

Go deeper: Pelosi's point of no return

Go deeper

Reports: CIA director's team member reported Havana Syndrome symptoms

Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) director Bill Burns during a House Intelligence Committee hearing in April on Capitol Hill. Photo: Al Drago-Pool/Getty Images

A member of CIA director Bill Burns' team who traveled with him to India this month was treated for "symptoms consistent with Havana syndrome," CNN first reported Monday.

Why it matters: Current and former officials told the New York Times the incident signals a "possible escalation" in the mysterious neurological symptoms affecting as many as 200 Americans who've worked in overseas posts since 2016.

Updated 1 hour ago - World

Trudeau's government projected to win Canada election

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. Photo: Jeff Vinnick/Getty Images

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's Liberal government has been reelected in the national election, the CBC and CTV News projected on Monday night.

By the numbers: The Liberal Party needs to win 170 seats in the 338-seat House of Commons to form a majority government. Preliminary figures show the party ahead with 156 seats at midnight ET, with nearly 66% of polling stations reporting.

Pelosi's back-to-school math problem

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) may need votes from an unlikely source — the Republican Party — if she hopes to pass the bipartisan infrastructure bill by next Monday, as she's promised Democratic centrists.

Why it matters: With at least 20 progressives threatening to vote against the $1.2 trillion bipartisan bill, centrist members are banking on more than 10 Republicans to approve the bill.

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