Jun 24, 2019

Migrant children moved from border facility after reports of unsafe conditions

A temporary facility set up to hold immigrants is pictured at a US Border Patrol Station in Clint, Texas, on June 21. Photo: Paul Ratje/AFP/Getty Images

Most of the immigrant children detained by the U.S. government at a Border Patrol facility in Clint, Texas, have been relocated after reports exposed dangerous and unsanitary living conditions, according to AP.

The big picture: Attorneys visiting the facility last week found children suffering from a lack of nutrition and proper sanitation. Many were forced to sleep on cold floors and go days without access to toothbrushes and showers, while others were found to be suffering from flu or lice outbreaks, according to a New Yorker interview with one of the lawyers.

Rep. Veronica Escobar (D-Texas), who sent a letter to top border officials last Friday demanding accountability for the conditions, says only 30 out of the more than 300 children detained are left at the facility. It is unclear where all of the children have been relocated, but Escobar says a portion were sent to a temporary facility on the north side of El Paso.

  • Border Patrol told the AP in a statement: "Our short-term holding facilities were not designed to hold vulnerable populations and we urgently need additional humanitarian funding to manage this crisis."

Between the lines: The conversation surrounding the treatment of children has been reignited in the wake of the AP's reporting last week, with the Trump administration again facing criticism for its response to the massive influx of immigrants at the southern border.

  • President Trump and Vice President Mike Pence both acknowledged on Sunday that the conditions were "terrible," but blamed Democrats for not allocating additional funding for the Department of Homeland Security.
  • Rep. Michael McCaul (R-Texas), who said on Sunday that conditions at facilities in his state were the worst he's ever seen, called on Congress to put aside partisan bickering and pass humanitarian aid to "take care of these children."

Go deeper: Read the AP's original report on the facility in Clint, Texas

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  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 7 p.m. ET: 932,605 — Total deaths: 46,809 — Total recoveries: 193,177Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 7 p.m. ET: 213,372 — Total deaths: 4,757 — Total recoveries: 8,474Map.
  3. Business updates: Very small businesses are bearing the brunt of the coronavirus job crisis.
  4. World update: Spain’s confirmed cases surpassed 100,000, and the nation saw its biggest daily death toll so far. More than 500 people were reported dead within the last 24 hours in the U.K., per Johns Hopkins.
  5. State updates: Florida and Pennsylvania are the latest states to issue stay-at-home orders — Michigan has more than 9,000 confirmed cases, an increase of 1,200 and 78 new deaths in 24 hours.
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World coronavirus updates: Spain's health care system overloaded

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins, the CDC, and China's Health Ministry. Note: China numbers are for the mainland only and U.S. numbers include repatriated citizens and confirmed plus presumptive cases from the CDC

Two planes with protective equipment arrived to restock Spain’s overloaded public health system on Wednesday as confirmed cases surpassed 100,000 and the nation saw its biggest death toll so far, Reuters reports.

The big picture: COVID-19 cases surged past 900,000 and the global death toll surpassed 45,000 early Wednesday, per Johns Hopkins data. Italy has reported more than 12,000 deaths.

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FBI sees record number of gun background checks amid coronavirus

Guns on display at a store in Manassas, Va. Photo: Yasin Ozturk / Anadolu Agency via Getty

The FBI processed a record 3.7 million gun background checks in March — more than any month previously reported, according to the agency's latest data.

Driving the news: The spike's timing suggests it may be driven at least in part by the coronavirus.